Fewer part-time workers elect health care coverage

Among eligible part-time workers, fewer elect health care benefits at large companies in comparison to full-time employees, according to the 2012 Study of Large Employer Health Benefits by ADP.

While 88 percent of full-time respondents are eligible for benefits, 77 percent enroll for health coverage. Thus, 67 percent of the total full-time work force is covered.

Part-time respondents make up 23 percent of the total work force, and only 53 percent of those respondents elect employer health care coverage. Based on this figure, part-time respondents represent less than 5 percent of employees enrolled in employer health care coverage.

The study also finds that the average employer contributes $7,236 each year in health premiums per participating employee. Although premium costs widely vary by employer, employers with more than 5,000 employees pay 14 percent less for health insurance than organizations with fewer employees. As part of the Affordable Care Act, any employee working more than 30 hours per week or 130 hours per month is eligible for employer-sponsored health plans, which could result in higher eligibility among part-time employees in 2014.

"Unlike survey-based studies, the data set in our study is derived from the actual, aggregated and anonymous benefits data and enrollment administration activity of large ADP clients representing multiple industries across all 50 U.S. states," says Tim Clifford, president of ADP Benefits Administration Services. "By providing key statistics on both full- and part-time work force composition along with current health coverage eligibility and participation rates, we are learning more about the challenges facing large organizations in the new era of health care reform."

 

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