We all know people who are all talk and no action. In manycases, those people are us.

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And in a lot of cases, those people are our employers.

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I view “workplace wellness” as one of those great myths—youknow, like flex time, unlimited PTO, or snowmen in summer.

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I hear about it constantly—and oh, yeah, write about it,ironically enough—but part of me questions its existence.

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I guess my cynicism comes from the fact that I've never seen itfirsthand. I've never worked for any company that offered such aprogram or even fostered a so-called culture of health. I've neverbeen offered reduced health care costs for getting my yearlyphysical, for being an ideal weight or for working out. I don'thave a standing desk. No free gym membership. Fruits and vegetablesaren't delivered to my desk. I don't have the opportunity to take ayoga class in the middle of the day.

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I've never participated in a workplace weigh-in, Biggest Loserstyle (though, let's be honest, this is a terrifying prospect).

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I've never even been invited on a walk with my coworkers. Theonly food around is when coworkers bring in doughnuts or muffins orsome carb- and-fat-loaded treats on birthdays or deadline days.

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Of course, workplace health and wellness is more than justphysical health—it's about managing stress levels, engagingemployees, and overall, making sure your employees are happy andhealthy.

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Unfortunately, I don't see that, either.

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I know I'm not the only one who feels this way. A new studyreveals the disconnect employees feel about their employers and themythical workplace wellness culture. In a nutshell, a great deal ofAmericans think employers who preach about health are just payinglip service.

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That sentiment exists even among employees whose workplaces havea wellness program. Keas surveyed 761 employees who participate inone of Keas' employer health programs. Nearly nine of 10 saidhealth is included in the company value statement, yet one-thirdfelt their employer did not practice what it preached.

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Specifically, 42 percent of employees don't feel their companytruly cares about their health and well-being. And, maybe evenworse, 43 percent of employees feel executives avoid dealing withand disciplining managers who cause unhappiness and stress amongemployees.

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On the flip side of this is the potential of workplace health:People want to be well and healthy—both physically and mentally—andthey want (and many times, need) that motivation from theiremployers.

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For example, the Keas survey reveals that 62 percent ofemployees believe their overall health would improve if theircompany did more to create a culture of health, and 66 percentbelieve they would be more productive and engaged at work if theircompany had a culture of health.

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It doesn't take a genius to figure out that happier employeesare going to result in more productive and more engaged employees,not to mention ones that stay at their jobs longer.

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It's time for a real culture of health in the workplace—becausetalking the talk only goes so far. As do donuts.

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