(Bloomberg) -- President Barack Obama told workers helping toenroll Americans in health care plans offered under thePatient Protection and Affordable CareAct that they must fight efforts to scare off millionsof Americans who still have not purchased insurance.

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The president’s conference call Wednesday with enrollmentcounselors and advocates for his signature domestic achievement wasintended to boost enthusiasm for the program amidindications that sign-ups are flat-lining.

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The third open-enrollment period for private insurance soldunder the law began on Sunday.

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About 35 million people in the U.S. remained without insurancein 2015, according to the Congressional Budget Office, despite alaw intended to cover nearly all legal residents.

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"They’ve been fed a lot of misinformation and this has becomeunfortunately this political issue that it never should have been,"Obama said on the call. "That’s in a lot of circumstances scaredthem off, and we’ve got to make sure we reach them."

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Obama said that the government’s data showed that six in 10people still did not know that tax credits were available to helpthem purchase health insurance.

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He also warned that enrollment efforts would suffer fromdiminishing media coverage in the third year of the program.

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"We’re anticipating we’re not going to have the same amount ofnational media attention we’ve had in the past, so we’re going tohave to be more creative," Obama said.

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The administration has already downplayed expectations.

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Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell last month saidshe expects only 10 million Americans to be enrolled by late2016--a modest increase from the 9.1 million projected to haveplans purchased through the ACA’s insurance exchanges by the end of2015.

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The Congressional Budget Office said in June that it expectedabout 20 million people to be enrolled in exchange plans in2016.

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Administration officials have acknowledged difficulty reachinguninsured people who haven’t yet signed up.

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Burwell said on Twitter on Tuesday that 250,000 applications forinsurance had been submitted in the first two days of openenrollment, a number that does not represent the number ofconsumers who had selected and purchased a plan.

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Kentucky complication

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State politics also complicate the White House’s efforts toexpand PPACA.

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On Tuesday, Kentucky elected Matt Bevin, aRepublican who promised to close his state’s ACA insuranceexchange, Kynect, and reshape its expansion of Medicaid.

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White House press secretary Josh Earnest said Wednesday thatresidents of Kentucky would still be able to purchase insurance onthe federal healthcare.gov system, and that he was encouraged byBevin’s pledge not to strip Medicaid coverage from people alreadyenrolled in the program.

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"Vowing to repeal the Affordable Care Act in some cases has beenused as an effective political strategy that’s not a terriblyeffective governing strategy," Earnest said.

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The president said he hoped to convince people already coveredunder the Affordable Care Act to re-enroll, while targetingoutreach efforts at those still without insurance.

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Marketing PPACA

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The marketing campaign will include an "unprecedented regionaland local marketing effort" as well as Twitter chats with Cabinetofficials and celebrity involvement in local PPACA events, saidKatie Hill, a White House spokeswoman.

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Obama will sit for five interviews with local radio stations onThursday, including one in Dallas, a city his administration viewsas among the most promising targets for outreach on the AffordableCare Act.

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Communities in northern New Jersey and Florida as well asAtlanta also will receive particular attention.

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"We’ll build on the many lessons we’ve learned over the past twoyears--for example, which messages consumers respond to, whichparts of the country they live in, and which weeks they tend toenroll during--to drive the activities of senior White Houseofficials, including the president himself," Hill said in ane-mail.

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The administration is particularly focused on minorities.

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Already, senior White House adviser Valerie Jarrett hosted acall with Al Sharpton and other black faith leaders, while domesticpolicy adviser Cecilia Munoz held a Twitter chat on healthinsurance and the Latino community.

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Administration officials have not said how much the marketingwill cost.

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