Nearly half of American workers say they are feeling increasingpressure to be more productive at work.

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Related: Focus on work-life balance will drive higherproductivity

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A survey of 1,200 full-time employees byFellowes, the 100-year-old company known for workplace products,such as office furniture, shredders and air purifiers, finds thatthe average employee spends 44 hours a week at work but that onlyan average of 29 hours a week are “productive.”

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Most workers also believe they have learned to be moreproductive as they have aged and gained more experience, althoughthe generation that employees view as the most productive isGeneration X, who are typically those in the middle of the agerange at the office.

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Employees identify talkative coworkers as the number onedistraction on the job, followed by unnecessary meetings andtechnology malfunctions.

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Bad equipment appears to be a serious concern for many; 59percent believe updating technology could lead to majorimprovements in productivity.

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Related: Is caregiving the silent killer of workplaceproductivity?

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Technological revolutions of the 1980s and 90s made Americanworkers far more productive as paper, typewriters, file cabinetsand fax machines were replaced by computers and email, RobertGordon, the author of The Rise and Fall of AmericanGrowth, explained to the Atlantic in August.

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But the significant technological gains of the past decade havenot led to the same type of growth in productivity, Gordon argues.As much as the iPhone has transformed our lives, it may not havemade us much better workers.

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“In much of the economy, daily practices of business methods arenot being influenced by the recent innovations in terms of robots,smartphones, or the other things that have happened more recently,”he says.

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The lack of a productivity game-changer helps explain why theU.S. economy appears to have settled into a period of steady butslow economic growth.

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Related: What brain science can teach us about employeeproductivity

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If a technological change isn’t going to bring about the type ofgrowth that corporate leaders yearn for, it may be workers out ofwhom bosses will seek to get additional productivity.

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