Opponents of the GOP health care legislation bill are trying torevive grassroots resistance ahead of a possible vote next week,but progressive groups worry that the investigations into PresidentDonald Trump and his campaign are diverting from efforts to deraila Senate version of the bill.

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Related: Sanders signals backing of Senate slowdown overhealth care bill

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Republican leaders plan to brief rank-and-file members on thedetails of their proposal this week, including changes to taxcredits and other provisions, and possibly share with them the textby the end of the week, according to a person familiar with theplan. That could set up a potential Senate floor vote on Obamacarerepeal next week, before senators leave town for the July 4recess.

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Democrats plan to begin a new offensive Monday night by throwingup procedural road blocks to most routine Senate business,according to a Democratic aide who asked for anonymity. They can’tstop everything, but they plan to use the slowdown to drawattention to the secrecy of Republican negotiations over theObamacare repeal effort.

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"If Republicans won’t relent and debate their health care billin the open for the American people to see, then they shouldn’texpect business as usual in the Senate," said Senate MinorityLeader Chuck Schumer of New York.

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Progressive groups have been calling on Democrats to fightharder to prevent Majority Leader Mitch McConnell from passing ahealth-care bill before a weeklong July 4 recess. Health-care billopponents want to hammer Republicans at home during the break in aneffort to kill the proposal later in the month.

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Investigations into Russian election meddling and Trump’sfiring of FBI Director James Comey have crowded health care off thefront pages.

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“The relentless pace of mind-blowing revelations on Russia havebeen a disaster for Donald Trump but also an opportunity for MitchMcConnell,” said Ben Wikler, Washington director for the liberalgroup MoveOn.org.

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Related: Trump calls GOP health care bill'mean'

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McConnell’s attempt to craft an Obamacare replacement behindclosed doors has also muted public focus on the coming debate,which groups say could help him get enough Republican support topass the measure. Senate Democrats have said they’re hatching abroader strategy to put more focus on Republican health-carelegislation that polls have shown is unpopular with the public.

Grassroots campaign

When the House was debating the health care bill earlier in theyear, a significant grassroots campaign against the measure nearlyderailed it, as Republican lawmakers were bombarded by hostilequestions and large crowds in town halls back home.

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Related: Study finds support for ACA provisions --mostly

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The Obamacare replacement passed by the House last monthincludes deep cuts to Medicaid and other health expenditures. Thenonpartisan Congressional Budget Office says it would cause 23million more Americans to be without health insurance by 2016. AMay 16-22 Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that 55 percent ofAmericans have an unfavorable view of it.

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“I think it’s time that we start focusing all of our attentionon health care,” said Senator Chris Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat.“This is a red-alert moment. This bill is speeding to thefloor.”

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So far, McConnell lacks a final measure and is struggling togain support in a chamber where Republicans have just 52 votes andno Democrats will support it. Senate Republicans plan to use anexpedited procedure to pass a health plan with as few as 50 votes,plus a tie-breaker from Vice President Mike Pence. That wouldbypass the usual 60-vote threshold and keep Democrats from blockingthe measure.

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Republicans are seeking a more modest version of the House bill,H.R. 1628. It would cut Medicaid by $834 billion over a decade,repeal $664 billion of Obamacare’s tax increases on the wealthy andthe health care industry, and end requirements that individuals gethealth insurance and that most employers provide it. It wouldreplace Obamacare subsidies with tax credits based primarily onage, and let states get waivers from some of the Affordable CareAct’s consumer protections.

Medicaid expansion

Senate Republicans are weighing a slower phase-out ofObamacare’s Medicaid expansion, better protection for people withpre-existing conditions, and tax credits based on income as well asage. They also must navigate abortion policy. Restrictions onabortion funding in the House bill are opposed by at least twoSenate Republicans -- Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski ofAlaska -- but if stripped out could thwart House approval of afinal measure.

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Related: Two studies look at Medicaid expansion pros,cons

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The clock is ticking. Senate Republican leaders have said theywant to move on to other issues after their August recess,including a tax-code overhaul, a debt-ceiling boost and next year’sspending bills.

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Groups opposed to getting rid of Obamacare, including the laborunion SEIU, NARAL Pro-Choice America and the Indivisible Project,are planning in early July to try to turn just enough Republicansagainst replacing the 2010 Affordable Care Act. Ezra Levin,co-executive director of the Indivisible Project, says his group isplanning sit-ins at senators’ offices, letters to the editor and --if any Republicans hold public town hall meetings -- a heavypresence of their advocates.

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“All we need are three Republicans to drop off and we can killit,” said Levin, whose organization was created to defeat Trump’sagenda and works through a network of over 5,800 local grassrootsgroups. He said his group is targeting 11 Senate Republicans,including Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Dean Heller of Nevada, RobPortman of Ohio and Collins and Murkowski.

Blocking action

The groups say they’ve urged Senate Democrats to block Senatecommittees and the full Senate from conducting routine business byrefusing to provide unanimous consent to move work along, a tacticthey’re now poised to use. If McConnell puts a bill on the Senatefloor using the fast-track process to avoid a filibuster, they wantDemocrats to delay debate by offering numerous amendments.

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Related: AHCA passage may mean job loss

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So far, Democrats have had a tough time getting their messageout as the Russia investigations are dominating news coverage andreporters are talking primarily to Republicans in a health debatethat relies only on their votes. Democrats have gotten sparseattendance at press conferences to highlight the House bill’simpact on Obamacare’s insurance exchanges, Medicaid funds foropioid treatment, and women’s health.

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The top Democrats on the Senate committees that would holdhearings if the GOP scheduled them -- Ron Wyden of the FinanceCommittee and Patty Murray of the health panel -- made pointedremarks about the secretive process at meetings last week. Thenboth panels moved right back to other routine work.

‘Cut out’

Wyden of Oregon complained that even his committee’s chairman,Orrin Hatch of Utah, was being “cut out” of discussions and thatthe process had become a “charade.” Now that the House measure hascome to the Senate, Wyden said that McConnell has “committed torushing the bill to a partisan vote on the floor with no review, nohearings, and no accountability to the American people.”

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Schumer sent a conciliatory letter to McConnell Friday, callingthe majority leader “Mitch” and asking all Senate Republicans tomeet with Democrats next week to talk about health-care policiesboth parties can support.

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“Our health care system affects every single American andone-sixth of our economy,” Schumer wrote. “We believe we all owe itto our constituents to pursue any bipartisan potential legislationbecause it profoundly impacts so many American lives.”

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Republicans fired back shortly afterward with a release titled,“Does All-Out War Sound Bipartisan?” listing quotes from Schumerand other Democrats promising to do everything they can to defeatthe emerging GOP measure.

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Copyright 2018 Bloomberg. All rightsreserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten,or redistributed.

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