Republicans might have to resort to a Plan B if they can’t cometo a consensus on repealing and replacing the Affordable CareAct.

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Related: Trump floats repealing ACA now, replacing itlater

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“If my side is unable to agree on an adequate replacement, thensome kind of action with regard to the private health insurancemarket must occur,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell toldattendees of a Rotary Club lunch in southern Kentucky, according toABC News.

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In about a week, McConnell plans on producing a fresh bill aftermore Republicans defected from the Senate’s current repeal andreplacement effort.

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A smaller bill might include provisions continuing federalpayments to insurers which help them contain costs for some lowearners and inducements to keep healthy people buying policies — astep which helps curb premiums.

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But McConnell acknowledges that might still not get enoughRepublicans on board to pass, particularly if the CongressionalBudget Office continues to assess tens of millions would be leftwithout insurance afterward.

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Related: ACA not failing as GOP claims

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Even Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, is acknowledging any repeal andreplacement effort might fail, saying on San Antonio's KTSA Radiothe GOP’s Senate majority “is so narrow, I don't know if we can getit done or not.”

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Republicans might then look for help from the Democrats to passa bipartisan measure which fixes the ACA, though McConnellexpressed this strategy in somewhat vaguer terms: “We have anobligation to the American people to try and improve what wecurrently have. What we do know is the status quo is notsustainable.”

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Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., told attendees at a town hall meeting“there are people who tell me they are better off" under Obama'slaw, “and I believe them.”

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“We ought to try to take care of people who are harmed by theAffordable Care Act, by also ... meeting the needs of people whowere benefited by the Affordable Care Act,” Moran says, accordingto The Hill.

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“[That's] almost impossible to try to solve when you're tryingto do it with 51 votes in the United States Senate, in which thereis not significant consensus on what the end result ought tobe.”

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Related: Rare disease drugmakers join in worries over GOPhealth overhaul

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Moran says he believes senators should have publicly debated thebill, brought it to the Senate floor and tried to “figure out wherethere are 60 votes to pass something.”

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A bipartisan fix to the ACA might have to be the realistic pathto 60 votes, as there’s just not enough agreement among Republicansto find a way to repeal and replace the current health carelaw.

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“It really feels like they really haven’t even gotten togetherand figured out a plan yet,” former GOP Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetzsays, according to The Hill. “Here we’re turning the corner intoJuly and you still can’t point to a single thing that will uniteus.”

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Katie Kuehner-Hebert

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in Running Springs, Calif. She has more than three decades of journalism experience, with particular expertise in employee benefits and other human resource topics.