You know the drill. Women are facing greater retirement challenges than men: they livelonger and so will need more money to see them through—especiallybecause of the likelihood of their needing to spend more on healthcare—and they make less.

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While they provide care to family members in need, by the timethey hit retirement they’re much less likely to have anyone toprovide care to them—hence the increased health care spending.

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And they’re out of the job market for protracted periods of timebecause of having and raising children and/or providing care toailing and elderly family members.

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And a new study reveals that women, probablyunsurprisingly, are more likely to worry about their personalfinances.

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The MassMutual study finds that women are three times morelikely to say they cannot afford to save for retirement than men are. In addition,the study finds that among middle-income Americans, men and womenhave different saving habits, especially when it comes toretirement.

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Fifty-one percent of women say they worry at least once a weekabout money, while only 45 percent of men do, according to thestudy.

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And women are also more likely to bring their money worries withthem to work. Men, on the other hand, are twice as likely to saythey never worry about money.

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And when it comes to savings, while 74 percent of women and 71percent of men say they’re not putting away enough for retirement,men are more confident about ending up financially secure inretirement.

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While 47 percent of women say they are “not very” or “not atall” confident about being financially secure in retirement.

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Just 39 percent of men admit to that level of worry.

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While 44 percent of women say they can’t afford retirementsavings, just 14 percent of men say so—and men pay themselvesfirst, with 44 percent saying they save a set amount everymonth.

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Only 33 percent of women do that, with 47 percent saying theysave “whatever is left after expenses.” Among men, just 34 percentdo that.

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Women don’t think all that highly of their retirement plans,either, with a quarter of them saying they don’t save because theiremployer either doesn’t match retirement plan contributions ordoesn’t offer a compelling match.

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Among men, 21 percent say the same thing.

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And just 20 percent of women say they have $10,000 or more insavings for financial emergencies, while 30 percent of men do.

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In addition, 73 percent of women who are not saving for anythingother than retirement say all of their income goes towards monthlyexpenses and bills; 62 percent of men say the same. Women are alsoless likely than men to use any extra money to pay off debt (38percent to 47 percent, respectively).

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