Not that it wants to provide benefits itself, but Uber—knownfor classifying its drivers as independent contractors, thus ineligible foremployee benefits—has come out in favor of the creation of a wholenew “portable benefits” system. To be created by the state ofWashington, that is. Not Uber.

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Related: Is Uber the next health-caredisruptor?

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Geek Wire reports that Uber’s new CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, has coauthoredan open letter with Seattle investor and workers’ rightsadvocate Nick Hanauer and David Rolf, president of the SEIU 775labor union, that urges the state to put together a system for thenon-employees of companies such as Uber that makes it possible forthem to have a benefits package that would go with them as theymove from job to job.

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The gig economy and the so-called sharing economy both make itpossible for people to find paying work even if they can’t find aregular job or need additional income beyond whatever their otherwork arrangements may be.

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But the companies that provide the framework for that work, suchas Uber, distance themselves from the people who work for themproviding car rides, food delivery and other services. Asemployees, those workers would be entitled to employee benefits; asgig workers, contract workers or freelancers, they’re not, and thatleaves them without the safety net that traditional employment hasprovided for decades.

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But the odd-couple letter urges the state to step in whereemployers fear to tread. In part, it says, “The American socialsafety system, which was designed in the 20th century for a verydifferent economy, has not kept pace with today’s workforce. At abasic level, everyone should have the ability to protect themselvesand their loved ones when they’re injured at work, get sick, orwhen it’s time to retire.”

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Washington—the state, not the capital—has been progressiveenough to boost laws that favor workers, so it’s a possibility thatchange could start there on benefits as well. Already, the statehas passed one of the most generous paid family leave policies inthe country, and back in 2015, Seattle pushed through a landmarklaw allowing Uber drivers to unionize—even though that one is miredin court cases at present.

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In addition, says the report, “This month, Washingtonlegislators introduced abill in the state House that would extend benefits coverage tocontract workers. If enacted, the bill would require companies tocontribute funds to an outside benefits provider based on servicesrendered by contract workers. The providers would offer benefits,like health insurance, industrial insurance, paid time off, andretirement, to non-employed workers.”

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Of course, considering Uber’s history, its motives andinvolvement in such advocacy are suspect. The report highlightsHeidi Groover of The Stranger as questioning whether the letter isjust another possible avenue by which Uber could escape classifyingits drivers as employees.

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