Kevin Trokey is foundingpartner and
coach at St. Louis-based Q4intelligence.

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I'm convinced the earth is spinning faster than it used to.

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At the end of one school year a few years back, each of my fourkids said, “I can't believe the school year is over already!” Idon't know about you, but I never felt a school year went fast.

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My kids are now moving through typical rites of passage into adulthood: graduatingfrom high school and college, getting married and living abroad.Wow! How can that be?

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Related: Fiduciary lessons my mother taughtme

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Why is it that when we're young, we can't wait to grow up andonce we grow up, we long to be young again? You can't return toyour childhood, but if you can find a little of your leftover innerchild, it can make this responsibility thing a whole lot more fun.Here are a few suggestions.

Ask questions like a 3-year-old

Have you ever marveled at the ability of a 3-year-old to askquestions? I think it's because everything is so new to them; theyhave a truly insatiable curiosity. It can be exhausting, but youhave to love their enthusiasm to question and learn.

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We approach sales opportunities from our serious, adult,“me-focused” perspectives. We tell ourselves, “They must be dyingto know everything about the history of our agency, our experience,the level of service we provide, blah, blah, blah.”

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Imagine if you brought a 3-year-old's curiosity to everymeeting. How much more would you know about your clients' issues,fears, and opportunities? How much more of an impact could you makeon their business? Don't you think they'd rather end the meetingexhausted from your questions than bored to tears?

Be as optimistic as a 10-year-old

When my son was 10, I would sometimes shake my head at theoptimism he brought to each day. If I shared some of the things hejust knew he was capable of doing, you'd have suggested a batteryof tests.

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Still, you found yourself rooting for him and expecting success,even though what he was attempting violated three laws of physicsand common sense.

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I think it was because he didn't carry the baggage of everythingthat “can't be done.” He just assumed that because he wanted it andbelieved in his ability, it would happen.

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What if you could eliminate the head trash that keeps youfocused on everything you can't do?

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If you approach opportunities by using every resource at yourdisposal and proceed with passion and determination, there is avery real chance it will happen. And when you have that confidence,others will sense it.

Feel as invincible as a 21-year-old

For some, the memories may be cloudier than others, but I'm sureyou can remember that sense of invincibility. Minor setbacks seenfor what they were: minor setbacks. The thought that somethingcould go wrong rarely kept us from trying something new. How comebeing “double-dog dared” ceases to be a challenge that must beaccepted?

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Nothing about the sales process, about changing how you work, ortrying something new, is life-threatening. There will be minorsetbacks along the way—rejections and deals we don't win—but wealways survive.

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My challenge is to bring your inner child to work with you. Askquestions like a 3-year-old. Embrace optimism like you're 10. Notonly would it be powerful, but wouldn't it be fun to play and worklike a little kid again?

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Go ahead, I double-dog dare ya!

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