The percentage of U.S. workers with employer-sponsored health coverage has dropped since the Great Recession began in 2007.

Analysts have debated whether group coverage rates dropped because employers were offering health benefits to fewer workers or if fewer workers were taking up the benefits offered.

Paul Fronstin of the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI), Washington,  has looked at government survey data and concluded the most obvious change has been an increase in the unemployment rate.

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Allison Bell

Allison Bell, a senior reporter at ThinkAdvisor and BenefitsPRO, previously was an associate editor at National Underwriter Life & Health. She has a bachelor's degree in economics from Washington University in St. Louis and a master's degree in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. She can be reached through X at @Think_Allison.