SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Restaurants and other businesses in this food-loving tourist mecca collected almost $14 million dollars in extra fees last year from their patrons, as they sought to comply with the progressive city's landmark universal health-care ordinance.

But an Associated Press analysis of records showed that roughly 40 percent of that money hasn't been spent on their workers' health care.

The surcharges, which range from 3 to 5 percent and often appear in fine print on receipts, are one result of San Francisco's five-year-old health care program, which includes some of the most far-reaching such requirements mandated by any U.S. city.

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