Doctors are most likely to reject Medicaid patients more thanany health care consumer, a new survey published in HealthAffairs finds.

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More than three in 10 doctors—31 percent—say they wouldn'taccept new Medicaid patients.

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It could spell trouble for the Patient Protection and AffordableCare Act, which aims to expand Medicaid. The number of thosepatients could increase by as much as 16 million due to healthreform.

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Less than 70 percent of doctors said they were accepting newMedicaid patients, much lower than those accepting privatelyinsured patients (81 percent) or Medicare patients (83 patients).The reason for this is fairly obvious: Doctors get less money fortreating Medicaid patients.

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Sandra Decker, an economist with the Center for DiseaseControls, used a survey of 4,326 office-based physicians fromacross the country.

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The numbers did vary significantly by state. In Wyoming, forexample, 99 percent of doctors were willing to accept new Medicaidpatients. But only 40 percent of New Jersey doctors said they woulddo the same, according to the study.

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