I recently spent a week on vacation—and I was awesome at it.

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Not only did I get to hang out with my favorite giant mouse andgo on rollercoasters, but I was super physically active allweek.

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On average during my week in Disney World, I walked 10-plusmiles a day. (A good, you know, 9.5 miles more than I walk on anaverage day).

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How do I know how much I walked? Because of my Fitbit, a smalldevice you wear that measures the steps you take, calories you burnand stairs you climb in a day. I’ve been wearing it since my momgave it to me for my birthday last fall (thanks for the hint,Mom!).

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Here's the part where I disclose to you that I actually gained afew pounds during my week in The Happiest Place on Earth. It may ormay not have to do with the ridiculous amounts of wonderful foodand drinks I consumed, including beer and wine from all over theworld (when I say “world,” I of course mean the World Showcase inEpcot that showcases faux countries) and the ice cream I enjoyed atleast twice a day. Can you blame me? Have you had a Mickey Bar?But, hey, clearly if I hadn't been walking everywhere for days onend, then I’m sure my waistline would’ve fared much worse.

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Here's the thing about the Fitbit: It's kind of addicting. Lastweek, for example, I was almost as excited to see my final tally ofsteps at the day's end as I was to ride Tower of Terror. I waspumped to see the numbers climb higher than ever—past 20,000, up to25,000.

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In fact, when I didn't hit 20,000 steps at the end of one day, Iwent back outside the hotel and just aimlessly wandered arounduntil I hit my goal. When I say I walked “aimlessly,” by the way, Imean I literally walked back and forth and in zigzag patternsacross the same path and down the hotel hallways. I’m fairlyconfident bystanders either thought I was mentally impaired or justcommitted some kind of crime and was making a bizarre flee from thescene.

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Throughout the week, I kept sneaking peeks at how many steps I’dtaken throughout the day. And I always wanted more.

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Fitbit likes to tell people that 10,000 steps daily (roughlyfive miles) is the “magic number.” (So does the American HeartAssociation, which uses the 10,000 steps metric as a guideline forimproving health and decreasing risk of heart disease, the No. 1killer of men and women in America.)

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I won't lie to you: I’ve been very shy of hitting that number inmy day-to-day life. In fact, it's been pretty embarrassing and abig wakeup call as to what kind of (inactive) life I’ve beenliving.

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My day-to-day life driving to and from work and barely walkinganywhere is pretty sad. My recent trips have actually helped me agreat deal. In Boston, I walked 10,000-plus steps a day; in LasVegas, I reached 20,000; and at Disney World, more than 25,000.

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What has this personal fitness device taught me? That everyonecan be more in control of their physical routine—and they can havesome fun doing it. Every step counts. And of course, it's taught methat I need to take more vacations.

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Though many people with such devices as the Fitbit can sync upwith each other and compare and compete against one another, mychallenge is personal. I just want to live a healthier, more activelife. It's easy motivation, and I’d encourage anyone to try it.

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Oh, and if you see some woman walking around like a crazy personin circles and diagonally, don't be frightened. It's only me. Socome over and say hello.

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