Pity the poor millennials. Laden with student debt, unable tofind jobs — or to find enough of them to make ends meet, many havebeen reduced to returning home to their parents’ (formerly) emptynests, there to try to figure out a new strategy on how to maketheir way in the world. But now they have another burden: guilt —for messing up their parents’ retirementplans.

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What’s that again? Yes, many millennials — although certainlynot only millennials — are getting financial support of one kind oranother from mom and dad, despite the fact that mom and dad shouldpresumably be salting away any spare cash they find against theirfuture retirement.

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How widespread is it? A new LIMRA Secure Retirement Institutestudy found that six out of every 10 American parents are providingfinancial support to their adult children, regardless of its effecton their retirement plans.

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“Research shows that millennials have weathered the mostsignificant repercussions from the recent economic downturn. Whilemillennials are the most educated generation in history, nearlyfour in 10 are unemployed and many more are underemployed,” saidDeb Dupont, associate managing director, LIMRA Secure RetirementInstitute, in a statement.

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“Parents of millennials, even those over the age of 22, areproviding considerable support to their children at a time in theirlives when saving for retirement should be a priority.”

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What kind of support? Parents are paying for everything fromcell phones/mobile service bills, rent/mortgage and collegeexpense/loans debt to entertainment — movies, sporting events, etc.Only 37 percent of U.S. households indicated in the study that theyaren’t providing any financial support.

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See also: Millennialsblame student debt for poor retirement saving

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It’s not just money the kids are getting. Seven out of every 10households with adult children say that one or more of them are(back) living at home. Almost three quarters of U.S. householdswith adult children between the ages of 18–22 have at least one ofthose adult children living at home.

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“Only 45 percent of parents who have financially supported theiradult children in the past year say it has negatively impactedtheir retirement savings,” Dupont said. “We believe people arelikely to underestimate the collective impact of incremental costs.Prior LIMRA Secure Retirement Institute research found that morethan 50 percent of preretirees have less than $100,000 in financialassets. Even $100,000 in total savings will not be enough money tofund the 20 to 30 years these individuals are likely to face inretirement.”

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