(Bloomberg) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, seeking to fight obesity, issued menu-labeling rules that force restaurants, movie theaters and grocery stores to add calorie information to the food they sell.

The regulations catch the rest of the country up to what cities like New York have already done. Pizzerias, whose a la carte options make precise nutrition information difficult, will have to provide a range of calorie counts. Movie theaters, which had been spared in a draft version, were included in the final rules, as were alcoholic beverages.

While some companies, like McDonald's Corp., had already been preparing for the changes, other industries were grappling today with how to implement the new rules. Grocery stores, for example, will have to provide calorie information on restaurant- style food from their salad or hot bars, though deli items like sliced meats and cheeses can be label-free.

Complete your profile to continue reading and get FREE access to BenefitsPRO, part of your ALM digital membership.

  • Critical BenefitsPRO information including cutting edge post-reform success strategies, access to educational webcasts and videos, resources from industry leaders, and informative Newsletters.
  • Exclusive discounts on ALM, BenefitsPRO magazine and BenefitsPRO.com events
  • Access to other award-winning ALM websites including ThinkAdvisor.com and Law.com
NOT FOR REPRINT

© 2024 ALM Global, LLC, All Rights Reserved. Request academic re-use from www.copyright.com. All other uses, submit a request to [email protected]. For more information visit Asset & Logo Licensing.