Americans appear less concerned about personal finances – eventhose relating to their retirement – this coming year than they areabout their personal figures (as in their bodies).

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Some 40 percent of those taking part in an Allianz Life surveylisted managing money better as the New Year’s resolution that theywould most likely make and keep during 2015. But 42 percent saidexercise and diet was the top resolution they would make andkeep.

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Spending more time with relatives and friends was listed by 32percent of those taking the survey. And 49 percent saidhealth/wellness was the most important focus for 2015.

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When it comes to retirement savings, only 14 percent of thoseresponding cited “increase my retirement savings” as a top thing toimprove finances next year.

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Compare this to the Bankrate.com survey earlier this year whichshowed 36 percent of Americans have nothing saved for theirretirement years. It was the same percentage, 14 percent, ofAmericans who are 65 or older, who said they had no retirementsavings, the Bankrate.com survey revealed.

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When it comes to the more recent Allianz survey, financialstability was selected by 30 percent of the respondents as a topfocus for 2015. On the other hand, financial planning was said tobe a top focus for New Year’s resolutions by 33 percent ofsurvey-takers in 2009. But just 15 percent selected it in 2014.

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Yet, advice from financial professionals appears to be indemand. Some 23 percent of survey respondents said they are morelikely to seek the advice of a financial professional in 2015,compared to just 19 percent in 2013.

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It is noteworthy, too, that 36 percent of Americans chose“financial professional” as their top choice if they were givenfree access to a professional, compared to 28 percent selectingnutritionist/dietician, 23 percent selecting a personal trainer,and 13 percent selecting a career counselor.

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Katie Libbe, vice president of Consumer Insights for AllianzLife, said the results reflect people’s increased “confidence” intheir finances, given improvements in the U.S. economy, such as inthe stronger stock market and lower unemployment rates.

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The Allianz survey also found that stress is still a problem formany Americans. Four in ten of those questioned said they are “morestressed” compared to how they felt at the end of 2013, when 39percent said their stress was “about the same.”

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What’s noteworthy is that many of the factors contributing tostress relate to finances. Some 45 percent said “databreaches by big retailers that could trigger identity theft” wastheir first or second concern in 2014. Also, some 42 percent cited“stagnant wages that prevent me from getting ahead financially.”Moreover, 38 percent picked “market uncertainty so I cannotconfidently grow my retirement savings.”

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Asked to identify the one thing that would improve theirfinances next year, 19 percent said “pay off credit cards”; 17percent said “build up my emergency savings”; and 14 percent said“increase my retirement savings.”

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The sixth annual Allianz survey was conducted online via Ipsoswith 1,004 respondents taking part.

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