At my previous job, I was a member of a very esteemed groupcalled the Funtastics.

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We were a random assortment of colleagues who wereresponsible—for you guessed it!—fun at the office.

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We arranged cultural excursions, pizza parties, happy hours,community service and charity projects.

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But my favorite events were usually the most ridiculous—oneswe'd giggle about through the planning stages. Those includedcostumes, field days and events that involved eating contests anddoughnuts on a string (I am a gifted, gifted event planner).

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In these events, even the office bigwigs partook in the fun (andyes, we have photographic evidence). And as corny as it sounds,those events really did put fun back into the office. Coworkersbecame friends, they enjoyed their job more, and they relaxed andhad a good time, even if just for a couple of hours.

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I'm pretty sure I was ahead of my time in all this.

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New research about company wellness from the InternationalFoundation of Employee Benefits Plans recently caught my eye. In anutshell, it said that traditional methods of wellness—such as flushots, fitness challenges and health risk assessments—while stillpopular, are being supplemented by more unusual offerings.

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The new nontraditional wellness offerings cited by theorganization range from mental health coverage, tuitionreimbursement and community charity drives to onsite celebrations,themed-dress up days at the office and more vacation time.

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These nontraditional offerings are cool because they focus on anaspect of workplace wellness we all too little think about. Sure,I'm a big fan of fitness trackers and flu shots and all the otherthings that are important to physical health. They're a big andimportant part of workplace wellness, and without a doubt, theyshould be implemented. But at the same time, I've long assertedthat workplace wellness often misses the mark in terms of promotinga different side of wellness—one that includes mental, financialand social well-being.

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For workplace wellness to really work, all parts of thetrifecta—financial, mental and physical well-being—must beaddressed and implemented.

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Sometimes it doesn't take all that much. After all, how easy isit to offer up an extra day of vacation or to sing “Happy Birthday”and blow up a few balloons?

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The stats speak for the benefits: Among organizations analyzingand aware of their wellness ROI, 93 percent are achieving positiveROI—the average ROI per $1 spent is $3, according to thefoundation. Among organizations tracking more specific wellnessefforts, 54 percent said wellness efforts have improved engagement,45 percent said wellness efforts reduced absenteeism, and 38percent said wellness efforts have positively affected theirorganization's overall bottom line.

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And if that doesn't convince you, I offer you this to consider:When would you not want to see your CEO chase after adoughnut on a string?

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