Workers with the most time to prepare for retirement are themost stressed about their abilility to adequately save between nowand their golden years, according to the most recent Merrill Edgereport.

|

Gen Xers and millennials were more likely toanticipate saving shortfalls than were babyboomers and those already retired.

|

The survey examined savers with $50,000 to $250,000 ininvestable assets. Among the cohort, 74 percent of Gen Xers and 67percent of millennials are predicting financial stress inretirement, given how much they are saving now.

|

But 59 percent of current retirees surveyed say they arenot stressed over finances, and 73 percent say they will haveenough to live on through retirement, compared to 57 percent ofnon-retirees.

|

Those counter-intuitive figures are instructive, says AronLevine, head of Merrill Edge.

|

“It’s natural to be more concerned about an immediate issueversus something that’s well down the road,” reasoned Levine, in avideo release accompanying the study’s results. “That’s why thelatest results surprised us.”

|

He speculated that younger savers and pre-retirees mightbe more anxious because they will have to rely on their own savingsand investments at greater rates than retirees, more of whom haveguaranteed income streams from defined benefit plans.

|

Today’s savers should take note that fewer retirees aresuffering anxiety in retirement. “Younger Americans can learn fromtheir experience—that preparation pays off,” he said.

|

Four in 10 retirees said they invested outside of a workplaceretirement account in order to maximize retirement assets, whileonly 24 percent of non-retirees either do, or are able to do thesame.

|

About 63 percent of the retirees surveyed contributed to aworkplace savings account, while only 57 percent of non-retireessaid they are doing so.

|

Less than one-quarter of pre-retirees are working with afinancial advisor, while 38 percent ofretirees said they utilized formal advice in preparing forretirement.

|

About half of workers non retired said they plan on working atleast part time into retirement, while only 20 percent of retireessaid they are, or plan on working in retirement.

|

Predictably, more millennials are turning to technology to planfor retirement—27 percent said they use websites or apps to managefunds, compared to 16 percent of Gen Xers, 11 percent of babyboomers, and 5 percent of retirees.

Complete your profile to continue reading and get FREE access to BenefitsPRO, part of your ALM digital membership.

  • Critical BenefitsPRO information including cutting edge post-reform success strategies, access to educational webcasts and videos, resources from industry leaders, and informative Newsletters.
  • Exclusive discounts on ALM, BenefitsPRO magazine and BenefitsPRO.com events
  • Access to other award-winning ALM websites including ThinkAdvisor.com and Law.com
NOT FOR REPRINT

© 2024 ALM Global, LLC, All Rights Reserved. Request academic re-use from www.copyright.com. All other uses, submit a request to [email protected]. For more information visit Asset & Logo Licensing.

Nick Thornton

Nick Thornton is a financial writer covering retirement and health care issues for BenefitsPRO and ALM Media. He greatly enjoys learning from the vast minds in the legal, academic, advisory and money management communities when covering the retirement space. He's also written on international marketing trends, financial institution risk management, defense and energy issues, the restaurant industry in New York City, surfing, cigars, rum, travel, and fishing. When not writing, he's pushing into some land or water.