The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act created moreinsured Americans. But one thing it can’t create is more medicalproviders.

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A new survey from the Kaiser Family Foundation and theCommonwealth Fund found that access to medical services for thesenewly minted, insured folks, which was forecast to be a seriousissue, hasn’t turned out to be a problem, atleast not so far.

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Read: PPACA demand by zip code

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Says the report: “Most primary care doctors, nursepractitioners, and physician assistants report an increase inMedicaid or newly insured patients since the Affordable Care Act's(ACA) major coverage provisions took effect, yet little change intheir ability to provide high-quality care.”

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The researchers said that about half the primary care cliniciansinterviewed say their patient volume is up since the reform acttook effect.

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Read: Insured are willing to get routine bloodtests

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An even larger percentage reported that there are newly insuredpatients coming in for service, covered by PPACA insurance. About the same percentage say the added caseload hasn’t negativelyaffected their ability to provide patients with high quality healthcare services.

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Read: Out-of-pocket costs on therise

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“Millions of Americans have gained coverage since the AffordableCare Act took effect, and previous surveys have shown that mosthave been able to find doctors and get the health care they need,”said Commonwealth Fund President David Blumenthal, M.D. “This studyprovides evidence that primary care providers have been able tomaintain quality of care for all of their patients, including thosewith Medicaid and new coverage.”

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“Physicians are highly trained professionals, but when itcomes to the Affordable Care Act, they turn into partisans, thesame way the general public does,” Kaiser Family FoundationPresident and CEO Drew Altman said. “The survey finds thatphysicians who are Republicans are much more likely to perceivenegative effects from the law, while those who are Democrats arefar more likely to see positive ones.”

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Among the study’s other findings:

  • Most doctors and other practitioners say their patients'satisfaction and care experiences have not changed since January2014. Equal shares of doctors say satisfaction has improvedand gotten worse, while nurse practitioners and physicianassistants are somewhat more likely to say it improved.

  • About four in 10 primary care physicians say that almost alltheir patients who request a same- or next-day appointment can getone, and another quarter say that most of their patients can. These rates are similar to those measured in 2009 and 2012 byprevious Commonwealth Fund surveys of primary care physicians.

  • Primary care physicians who have seen an increase in Medicaid ornewly insured patients are less likely to say almost all theirpatients can access a same- or next-day appointment. This mightstem in part from preexisting differences in capacity; forinstance, those seeing more newly insured patients are more likelyto work in community clinics, few of which provide same- ornext-day appointments to all patients.

  • 83 percent of primary care physicians continue to accept newpatients, down slightly from 89 percent in 2012. The shareaccepting new Medicaid patients, 50 percent, is essentiallyunchanged.

  • 40 percent of primary care providers say that the time they canspend with each patient has gotten worse since January 2014.

  • About three in 10 physicians say they are "somewhat" or "very"dissatisfied with the amount of time they are able to spend withpatients.

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Dan Cook

Dan Cook is a journalist and communications consultant based in Portland, OR. During his journalism career he has been a reporter and editor for a variety of media companies, including American Lawyer Media, BusinessWeek, Newhouse Newspapers, Knight-Ridder, Time Inc., and Reuters. He specializes in health care and insurance related coverage for BenefitsPRO.