If you want to spend time with your newborn, make plans now toland a job in the nation’s capital.

|

A bill introduced by a majority of the Washington, D.C.council today would guarantee 16 weeks of paid family leave for residents of thecapital city, the Washington Post reported.

|

The newspaper noted that some version of the legislation willlikely be approved, since a majority of the members already supportit.

|

Read: Top 10 best and worst states for workingmoms

|

Highlights of the proposed law include:

  • Those on leave would receive 100 percent of their salaries,up to $52,000 a year.

  • Those earning above $52,000 would receive $1,000 a weekand 50 percent of their income, with a $3,000 cap.

  • Residents of Maryland and Virginia who work for the federalgovernment would not be covered by the law.

  • The law would be funded by a tax on district employers.

“The District of Columbia would become the most generous placein the country for a worker to take time off after giving birth orto care for a dying parent under legislation to be introduced todayand supported by a majority of the D.C. Council,” said aspokesperson for the Disability Management Employer Coalition.

|

“The D.C. legislation would more than double the length of anypaid-leave program in the country. Only three states have enactedsuch laws over the past 10 years. Currently, the maximum benefit issix weeks of partial paid leave in New Jersey and California.”

|

Read: Netflix isn't starting a benefitsrevolution

Complete your profile to continue reading and get FREE access to BenefitsPRO, part of your ALM digital membership.

  • Critical BenefitsPRO information including cutting edge post-reform success strategies, access to educational webcasts and videos, resources from industry leaders, and informative Newsletters.
  • Exclusive discounts on ALM, BenefitsPRO magazine and BenefitsPRO.com events
  • Access to other award-winning ALM websites including ThinkAdvisor.com and Law.com
NOT FOR REPRINT

© 2024 ALM Global, LLC, All Rights Reserved. Request academic re-use from www.copyright.com. All other uses, submit a request to [email protected]. For more information visit Asset & Logo Licensing.