The U.S. is not alone in its struggle with high drug prices.

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IMS Health, a health care industry consulting firm, projectsthat global drug spending will rise 30 percent in the next fiveyears.

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By 2020, the world will be spending $1.3 trillion on medicine,up from the current $1 trillion.

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In fact, reports the firm, consumers would likely be on the hookfor even more if some important medical patents weren’t set toexpire in the next few years.

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The generic versions of someexpensive medicines will offersignificant savings to consumers.

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Like many other economic sectors, much of the pharmaceuticalindustry’s future growth will be driven by emerging economies inAsia, Latin America, and Africa. IMS cutely refers to countriessuch as China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil, which account for over3 billion consumers, as “pharmerging markets.”

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In total, the report claims that emerging markets will claimtwo-thirds of global medicine spending by 2020, when more than halfof the world’s population will be taking more than one drug doseper day.

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While drug use remains significantly higher in developedcountries, the gap between use in the developed and developingworld will narrow in the coming years, the report states.

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But the West still has a vital role to play in fueling the drugindustry.

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Wealthy countries are still home to most of the criticalresearch and development that leads to expensive new medicines. Thegroup estimates that 225 new drugs will be approved for sale in thenext five years.

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"In developed countries, it's all about the innovation comingout of the R&D pipelines. We've got this surge of innovation,particularly in oncology and rare diseases and hepatitis C," MurrayAitken, executive director of the IMS Institute for HealthcareInformatics, told the AP.

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Read: Double-digit cost hike predicted for pharmacydrugs

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Other technological innovation will make a big impact on healthcare in the coming years, although it’s not always clear whetherthat means higher costs or savings for patients.

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The rise of telehealth will hopefully make it cheaper and easierfor providers to keep tabs on patients and avoid costly andunnecessary visits.

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“By 2020, technology will be enabling more rapid changes totreatment protocols, increasing patient engagement andaccountability, shifting patient-provider interaction, andaccelerating the adoption of behavior changes that will improvepatient adherence to treatments,” says the report summary.

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