It’s been a year since the Supreme Court enshrined same-sexmarriage as a right in all 50 states, but employers still have workto do to make sure their LGBT employees are aware of the benefitsavailable to them and their partners, a new study suggests.

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Related: Obama administration issues new health carediscrimination rule

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A survey conducted by Radnor, Pennsylvania-based LincolnFinancial Group of 314 LGBT employees found that just over halfsay they would like to speak to an expert about the benefitsavailable to them because of the court ruling. Why? Because half ofthem say they are not aware what way, if any, the landmarkdecision, Obergefell v. Hodges, had on their benefits.

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“When we have a major legal change like this, employers need toproactively educate their employees on its effects,” said LisaBuckingham, chief human resources officer at Lincoln FinancialGroup. “If we can help an even greater percentage of LGBT employeesunderstand the ruling’s implications, they will be able to trulyget the most value out of their benefits packages and take chargeof their financial futures.”

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Related: LGBT Americans more likely to beuninsured

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To be clear, many of those who voiced uncertainty about theeffect of the ruling on their workplace likely work for companiesthat didn’t have to change their benefit policies. Many employersalready offered spousal benefits to workers in committed same-sexrelationships for years before the ruling.

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Particularly for national or international employers, offeringdomestic partner benefits whether or not state governmentsrecognized same-sex marriage was seen as an important recruitmentand retention tool, as well as beneficial in terms of publicrelations.

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Related: Few employers offer transgender-inclusive healthcare

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In the past year, only 11 percent of LGBT employees said theyhad enrolled in a new medical plan. Seven percent have made changesto their retirement plan.

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A larger percentage have at least considered making changes totheir plans, however. Twenty-eight percent said they had takenanother look at what benefits are available to them.

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The poll also found that LGBT workers voice a greater interestin additional benefits, such as long-term or short-term disability,than the average employee. Twenty-seven percent of LGBT workers whoare not currently enrolled in a disability insurance plan say theyplan to sign up in the future, compared to 13 percent of thegeneral employee population.

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