In today's evolving business world, corporate culture and uniquebenefits are often big draws for prime talent.

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New hires want to know what employers can provide outside ofstandard medical and dental coverage, and that's where thelatest HR buzzword “wellness” comes in.

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Although an innovative approach to overall employee health andhappiness, wellness programs actuallydate back to the late 1800s. For decades, businesses like the PullmanCompany, the NCR Corporation, and Hershey Foods have institutedemployee fitness programs, complete with employee gyms, recreationparks, and daily exercise breaks, though some of these perks werereserved for top executives only.

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But now, wellness plans exist for many employees and deliver abroad spectrum of desirable offerings.

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Research from Fidelity and the National Business Group on Healthsays employers are dramatically expanding corporate wellnessprograms in recent years, spending an average of $693 per employeeon incentives in 2015.

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Many companies have already implemented enviable wellnessinitiatives. Here are a few incentives we wouldn't mind having inour office:

1. Nap pods

Arianna Huffington, the latest crusader for solving what shecalls a “sleep deprivation crisis,” literally wrote thebook on getting enough shuteye. Her book, “The Sleep Revolution,”examines how lack of sleep affects almost every facet of a person'slife, and how sleep deprivation links to diabetes, heart attack,stroke, cancer, obesity, Alzheimer's, lower productivity andcreativity, as well as poorer quality of relationships and sex.

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For a country that has long held the saying “time is money” inhigh esteem, Huffington (among many others) is advocating forworkers to regard sleep as equally important to other healthyliving adjustments.

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According to Sleep.org, 29 percent of workers report fallingasleep or feeling sleepy on the job, costing the U.S. $63 billioneach year in lost productivity. To address the issue head on, somecompanies are taking a page out of Huffington's book andencouraging workday snoozes.

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Zappos, the online shoe retailer, has a nap room in its LasVegas headquarters. Nike's Portland, Oregon office has a quiet roomwhere employees can sleep or meditate. As for the Huffington PostHQ? Rest spaces require reservations and are often booked solid.

2. On-site workouts

After a full day of work, the prospect of physical activity canbe less than enticing. The reluctance to work out is a bit of acatch-22, as increased activity heightens blood flow to the brain,resulting in higher alertness and energy, lower stress, andimproved concentration.

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With this in mind, it's no surprise that some companies opt forphysical activities on-site. Clif Bar, based in Emeryville,California, boasts an 115,000-square foot fitness haven. Chock fullof physical activity stations, the space is home to a climbing rockwall, loaner bikes, a yoga room, two massage rooms, a dance studio,and a workout room that offers 33 different health classes.

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And if you're thinking, “Oh, well that just means I'll have tobe at work longer to work out,” that might be true, but Clif Barencourages workday workouts by offering two and a half hours ofpaid gym time per week.

3. Catered meals

When workdays get busy, it's easy to opt for quick snacks andcaffeine boosts from sugary sodas that leave much to be desiredwhen it comes to health. While this type of nonchalance has createdhabits that give the illusion of efficiency (unhealthy options areoften readily available, cheap, and allow workers to quickly getback to tasks at hand), poor eating can lead to a shortage of workproductivity and mental clarity.

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“Poor meal programs and poor nutrition underlie so manyworkplace issues: morale, safety, productivity, and the long-termhealth of the workers and nations,” says Christopher Wanjek, authorof “Food at Work: Workplace Solutions for Malnutrition, Obesity andChronic Diseases.”

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One Silicon Valley startup, Asana, a work tracking app company,offers organic meals for lunch and dinner prepared by a full-timein-house chef.

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Kaiser Permanente revamped its cafeteria to meet Partnership forHealthier America guidelines, providing healthier food options andeliminating sugar-sweetened drinks in cafeterias and vendingmachines. It also offers more than 50 in-house farmer's marketsacross its offices.

4. Parental leave and fertility treatment

It's no secret that U.S. family leave polices lag behind therest of the world (most countries offer paid maternity leave, whilea growing number offer paternity leave), but some companiesrecognize that family is a major part of overall employeewellness.

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Netflix recently made headlines when it announced all employeeswould be provided one year of paid parental leave after the birthor adoption of a child. Etsy now offers six months of paid leave.Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg used his company's policy (16 weeks)to take two months off after the birth of his daughter. Fertilityis another issue that can arise when families decide to put offchild rearing to reach career goals. Apple and Facebook are twocompanies looking to help. Both offer up to $20,000 in egg freezingprocedures for female employees. Advocates say this initiativegives women the power to “level the playing field” with men byalleviating some of the pressure of answering to a biologicalclock.

5. Stop smoking initiatives

Helping smokers quit can save lives — and money. According tothe American Lung Association, workplace smoking cessationinitiatives can lower health care costs, increase workerproductivity, and prevent premature deaths.

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Mitesh Patel, a University of Pennsylvania professor in itsmedical school, says that while encouraging smoking cessation canbe difficult (either you quit or you don't, he says, it's not likeweight loss where there are quantifiable variations in success),incentive-based initiatives have proved helpful.

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“Some work led by my colleagues, Kevin Volpp and Scott Halpern,has tested ways to use financial incentives for smoking cessation —one large study with General Electric, another with CVS Health—andfound that financial incentives in the range of $700 to $800 overthe course of a year can triple smoking cessation rates.”

6. Dogs at work

Dog-friendly workplaces are quickly becoming a trend as petownership grows among millennials, the workforce's largestgeneration. In fact, many younger millennials are opting for petsinstead of children.

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All generations regard their pets as family, so it's no surpriseemployees want their four-legged friends nearby, but would youbelieve having dogs in the office can actually enhance health andwellness?

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Pets lower blood pressure, reduce stress hormones, and improveone's general mood by releasing dopamine and serotonin, the brain'sfeel-good chemicals. (I mean, seriously, hasn't everyone oo-ed andaw-ed over a new puppy?) Studies even show that those with dogs areless likely to be depressed.

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Zynga, a mobile gaming company based in San Francisco,encourages employees to bring their dogs to work, and even offerspartial insurance coverage for employee pets. In fact, Zynga'sfounder, Mark Pincus, is such a dog fan that he named the companyafter his own pup.

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As an added bonus, having a dog in the office means at least afew times a day, you'll be required to take a 10 minute break sohe can do his business, giving you an opportunityto stretch your legs and maybe even add some steps to yourtracker.

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