Although Donald Trump has triedbelatedly to pivot to more conventional Republican Party talkingpoints about economic issues, such as taxes and health care, it’spretty much anybody’s guess what he would actually do in the OvalOffice.

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One of the few things that has remained constant in Trump’sspeeches on health care is his desire to repeal the Affordable CareAct. What has been much less clear has been what he intends toreplace it with.

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This statement from nearly a year ago, during a speech, forinstance: “Obamacare. We’re going torepel it, we’re going to replace it, get something great. Repealit, replace it, get something great!”

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On occasion, particularly at the beginning of his campaign, hehinted that his appetite for government in health care was just asgreat, if not greater, than President Obama’s. In one interview hesaid the “government will pay for it” when asked who would pay forhis promise to provide universal coverage.

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He has also, in general terms, decried insurance companies,suggesting that he, as a master deal-maker, would be able to forcethem to offer care for much lower prices.

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On other days, particularly recently, the billionaire hasread classic conservative proposals on health care from ateleprompter. His website also largely sticks to familiar GOPideas, such as turning Medicaid into a block grant program,allowing insurance companies to sell policies across state linesand making individual health insurance premiums taxdeductible.

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At the very least, it appears health care is an issue thatTrump is willing to allow be dictated by the GOP establishment.That means that if he is elected, Republicans will expect him tosign an ACA repeal, although that would likely not be possibleunless the GOP gains enough seats in the U.S. Senate to break aDemocratic filibuster.

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The more important question, perhaps, is what Republicans inCongress will do about Obamacare in the likely event that HillaryClinton is elected president. Will they continue flying the“repeal” banner that they have carried for the past sixyears?

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"There just won't be any credible way to keep talking aboutrepealing the Affordable Care Act," Ron Pollack, executive directorof FamiliesUSA and a supporter of the law, told the AssociatedPress.

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There have been a number of indications over the past year thatsome Republicans are losing their interest in fighting against theACA, especially now that it has become ingrained in the U.S. healthcare landscape. In the event of another Democratic administration,some Republicans may consider working instead with Democrats toimprove the law.

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