They’re carrying a heavy load of anxiety—boomer women areworried about a triple threat of economic anxiety, concerns overSocial Security and caregiving.

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Related: Why more women are putting offretirement

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And their votes in the upcoming election could tip the balanceon these issues—some of which aren’t even being discussed.

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According to an AARP survey, among women 50–69, 74 percent ofthose with modest incomes and 64 percent of those making over$50,000 fear that prices will go up faster than those incomes.

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Related: Checklist for retirement: 6 questionsmarried women must ask

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In addition, 61 percent of those earning less than $50,000 alsoworry about paying too much in taxes—something 45 percent of theirhigher-earning sisters are also worried about.

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More money-focused anxiety surrounds the issue of retirement,with 46 percent overall worried about having financial security inretirement; for those earning less than $50,000, the percentagegoes up to 56 percent. And 47 percent are worried they won’t beable to take care of themselves as they get older.

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Social Security, which was originally devised to relieve thefears of aging workers by making sure they could get by when theycould no longer work, is a big focus of those fears these days—andit’s an issue that’s not getting a whole lot of attention so far inthe presidential campaign.

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Related: Boomers don't know how unprepared they arefor retirement

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It’s getting attention from boomer women, though, who aredevoting a lot of anxiety to it. Nearly two thirds—62 percent—saythey could be hurt by future benefit cuts, something they have goodcause to worry about in the current political climate.

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Most women—53 percent—say that the nearly 25 percent cut inSocial Security benefits that would result from inaction on SocialSecurity would impact them, including 32 percent who say it wouldimpact them “a lot.”

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And 38 percent are afraid that Social Security won’t be therefor them at all at retirement.

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Although both candidates say they won’t cut Social Securitybenefits, and Democrats are actively advocating expanding them, theRepublican position for years has been to reduce benefits ratherthan raise the ceiling on contributions or, in fact, take any otheractions.

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But if boomer women get their act together and focus on theissue, they could have an impact on the election, since almostthree quarters (72 percent)—and that’s across party lines—want thenext president and Congress to take immediate action on SocialSecurity.

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Oh, and that caregiver issue? More than half (55 percent) ofboomer women are or have been family caregivers, and more thantwo-thirds (68 percent) said they would be more likely to vote fora candidate who favors providing support for family caregivers.

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Actually, 67 percent favor giving a caregiver credit incalculating Social Security benefits to people who take time offfrom work to care for loved ones.

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