In what his campaign billed as a major health-care speechTuesday, Donald Trump offered no new details about his plan toreplace Obamacare, but re-emphasized the need to repeal the 2010law.

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Related: Trump finds opportunity in ACA premiumincreases

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The ideas outlined in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, by theRepublican presidential nominee — tax-free health savings accounts,insurance across state lines and sending Medicaid funds to states —were included in a white paper he unveiled in March. They largelymatch proposals popular among conservative policy advocates.

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If elected president, Trump said he would ask Congress toconvene a "special session" to repeal and replace the AffordableCare Act, invoking the legislative branch's power to come togetherduring adjournments. However, Congress is already scheduled to bein session by the time he would take office.

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"If we don’t repeal and replace Obamacare, we will destroyAmerican health care forever," Trump said.

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House Speaker Paul Ryan has been similarly vague about hisproposals to replace Obamacare, facing a lack of party-wideconsensus on what system to set up instead.

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Related: What's in store for the benefits industry underTrump or Clinton?

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After discussing health care, Trump moved to his standard stumpspeech, railing against free-trade deals like NAFTA, vowing tobring manufacturing jobs back and advance vocational training.

Vague plans

Trump has excoriated the health-care law since the first day ofhis campaign as a "disaster," but concluded that it was "blowingup" when the Obama administration announced that premiums forbenchmark mid-level health plans were increasing by 22 percent fornext year, on average.

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"She wants to put the government totally in charge of healthcare," Trump said, referring to his Democratic rival HillaryClinton. "It's one of the single most important reasons we must winin November."

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Related: Would a Trump loss save Obamacare?

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Clinton has proposed a series of changes to Obamacare, includingadding a public insurance option to the exchanges.

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While he's repeatedly vowed to repeal Obamacare, Trump has beenfar less clear about what would replace it.

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In March, Trump rolled out a vague blueprint for replacingObamacare that features many of the same ideas Republicans haveconsidered for years: selling insurance across state lines,tax-free health savings accounts, or HSAs, and block-grantingMedicaid for states. He has also called for allowing there-importation of cheaper drugs from abroad, a break from manyfellow Republicans.

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"We have to get rid of the lines around the state, artificiallines, where we stop insurance companies from coming in andcompeting," Trump said at the second presidential debate lastmonth. "We want competition."

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Trump and several down-ballot Republicans have slammed theirDemocratic opponents over the premium increases for the fraction ofAmericans purchasing plans on the exchanges, arguing that theAffordable Care Act was now unaffordable to many Americans.

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Related: 10 worst states for ACA premiums

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Clinton has not shied away from defending Obamacare on thecampaign trail, especially speaking to black voters aboutcontinuing progress under President Barack Obama.

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"I am going to defend President Obama’s legacy,’’ Clinton saidto a rousing ovation on Sunday during remarks at New Mount OliveBaptist Church in Fort Lauderdale. "And especially his AffordableCare Act, which gave 20 million people the chance to get healthinsurance.’’

Pence's way

Indiana Governor Mike Pence, Trump's running mate, also spoke inValley Forge, focusing on his decision to veer from the standardapproach to Obamacare by accepting federal money to expandMedicaid.

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Related: Trump and Clinton squeeze ACA and Medicare intofinal debate

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"We don't want the socialized health care they have in Canada.We want American solutions," he said Tuesday.

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Indiana has embraced Obamacare more than some otherRepublican-led states. Under Pence, the state last year opted toexpand its Medicaid program under the ACA, making most low incomepeople eligible for coverage. Nineteen states such as Texas andFlorida, mainly led by Republicans, have decided not to expandtheir Medicaid programs.

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Indiana took an unusual path to Medicaid expansion, though,getting a waiver from the federal government that let the statealter some key parts of the program. Most beneficiaries arerequired to pay co-pays of $1 to about $27 a month, based onincome. In some cases, beneficiaries are also required to paycopays if they go to an emergency department for care. MostMedicaid programs don't include premiums and co-pays.

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Individuals buying ACA plans in Indiana are also faring somewhatbetter. Premiums for benchmark mid-level ACA plans are decliningabout 3 percent in the state. A broader measure of how muchindividuals can expect to pay shows that premiums are going up byabout 19 percent, though that's still less than the nationalaverage. The number of insurers offering plans on the ACA exchangein the state is declining to four from eight.

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Related: Voters don't trust Trump on health care

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According to his campaign, Trump was joined by Wyoming SenatorJohn Barrasso and several Republican members of the House ofRepresentatives, including Georgia's Tom Price, Maryland'sAndy Harris, North Carolina's Renee Ellmers, Tennessee's ScottDesJarlais, Texas' Mike Burgess, and Wyoming's Cynthia Lummis.

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—With assistance from Kevin Cirilli, Zachary Tracer, MarkNiquette and Arit John.

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Copyright 2018 Bloomberg. All rightsreserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten,or redistributed.

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