In the final days of the most polarizing presidential race inrecent memory, a new survey shows that supporters of HillaryClinton and Donald Trump share a number of pessimistic views aboutthe state of the economy.

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Related: 5 ways Trump could weaken Social Security

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The survey of more than 1,000 U.S. voters byGOBankingRates finds that more than 80 percent of both Clinton andTrump voters are not confident that the wealth gap will narrow inthe coming years.

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Similarly, 60 percent of Clinton supporters and 61 percent ofTrump voters are not confident that unemployment will continue todrop. Finally, 81 percent of Clinton backers and 76 percent ofTrump fans aren’t confident that homeownership will become moreaffordable.

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More Clinton supporters (46 percent) are confident that wageswill increase in the coming years, however, than Trump supporters(37 percent).

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Related: Clinton tax plan seen costing 697,000 jobs amidlower wages

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Of course, perception of these issues is shaped by people’s lifeexperiences and their own economic situation, not just thepolitical ideology they subscribe to. There are also distinctionsbased on demographics.

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Baby boomers, for instance, are more than twice as likely asmillennials, the study finds, to express confidence in unemploymentdeclining. One potential explanation is the fact that boomers havesimply been around longer, have seen the economy in good times andbad, and generally enjoy greater job security and higher wages thanyoung people.

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Trump’s populist candidacy has shaken up the long-heldassumptions about what Republicans and Democrats think about anumber of issues.

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For instance, unlike recent GOP candidates, Trump has insistedhe will protect Social Security and Medicare as they currentlyexist, and attacked other Republican candidates during the primaryover their support for privatization of the programs.Traditionally, it has been the role of Democratic candidates whohave made defending entitlement programs, as Clinton continues todo now.

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Related: Trump and Clinton not so different on wages,economy

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Similarly, Trump has upended decades of Republican support forfree trade, and surveys now show that Democratic voters aremore likely to view international trade positively. Generally, ithas been Democrats in Congress who have opposed free trade dealsthat they view as facilitating the outsourcing of jobs tolower-wage countries.

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