Whether it's part of your New Year's resolution or just a way tokeep health care costs down, here are 10 healthy habits to take onin 2017.

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Related: 8 steps to a healthy breakroom for youremployees

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The new year always brings new resolutions, and as health care becomes an ever more prominentfactor in people's lives (not to mention budgets), its importanceoften leads to greater interest in ways to get, or stay, healthy,rather than having to resort to medical treatment.

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According to Natural Grocers, which interviewed a panel made upof the company's category managers, nutrition experts and editorialstaff, there are 10 trends in nutrition and health that areexpected to be top of mind in 2017.

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Headlines surrounding not just what we eat, but how it's sourcedand how we consume it have made people far more interested in wherethe contents of their dinner plates (or glasses) come from.

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Related: Why employers should care whether millennials eatveggies

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More creative ways to expand our diets have led to the potentialfor more nutritionally sound meals — and sometimes a taste of theexotic brings more to the table than flavor.

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Here are the 10 trends Natural Grocers predicts will be the mostinfluential in the coming year.

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10. Supplements — not always pills — can improvediet

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Although most people recognize that they're probably lackingsome nutrients in their diet, thanks to an overly busy lifestyleand possible fondness for unhealthy processed foods, that doesn'tmean that they look forward to downing a fistful of vitamin pillsevery day.

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That's where the inventiveness of manufacturers comes into play;Natural Grocers points out that “new and often less intimidatingforms of dietary supplements” such as “tasty fish oil liquidswirls, multivitamin gummies, superfood-rich smoothie mixes andcollagen powders” can fill the gap.

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9. Fats are no longer evil

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Recent research is showing that “healthy” fats are actually anessential part of the diet — or should be.

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A Washington Post article last year highlighted a study done on the so-called Mediterranean diet by HannahBloomfield, associate chief of staff for research for theMinneapolis VA Health Care System and a professor at the Universityof Minnesota, which was published in the Annals of InternalMedicine. It found that the evidence was strong enough to haveindividual doctors bring up such a diet on a case-by-case basis totheir patients.

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Says Natural Grocers, “Fats from coconuts, olives and avocadosare appearing in a variety of products and full-fat dairy is alsomaking a comeback. This is a positive trend as fat-soluble vitaminslike vitamins E and A are frequently missing from Americans'diets.”

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8. Snacking can be a healthy way to eat

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One would hope that snacking can be healthy, since, according toa study from Private Label Manufacturers Association, 62 percent ofmillennials snack throughout the day.

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With so much eating done via snacks instead of sit-down meals,Natural Grocers says snacks in the form of low-sugar, non-GMOand/or gluten-free products such as meat bars, hummus, vegetabledips and sardines will drive the snack trend.

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7. Naturally fed cattle produce healthier meat, milk,and supplements

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It's a step in the right direction to eliminate from your dietany milk produced with the use of bovine growth hormone, but goingit one better is to use only milk from grass-fed cows and goats,says Natural Grocers. Grasses are their natural diet, thushealthier for the cows.

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But rather than just stopping at dairy, Natural Grocers saysgrass-fed meat and even dietary supplements like whey protein arenow being sourced from grass-fed cattle.

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6. Cutting food waste is good for people and for theenvironment

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We waste a huge amount of food — nearly 40 percent a year in theU.S. alone. Globally, it's approximately a third of all foodproduced, which translates to approximately 1.3 billion tons,according to Food and Agriculture.

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Taking steps to reduce food waste not only means that the foodwe produce will go farther and feed more people, but will also cutgreenhouse gas emissions — which, according to National Geographicin 2015, amounted to more than 3.3 billion metric tons of carbondioxide (from energy that goes into the production, harvesting,transporting, and packaging of wasted food) and which, if it were acountry, would be the third largest greenhouse gas emitter afterthe U.S. and China.

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5. Wheat noodles are being displaced by spiralizedveggies

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Is it a craze? Maybe not. “Zoodles,” as they are dubbed, arezucchini squash spiralized with a specialized cutter to resembleregular noodles and used as a substitute for them in all sorts ofdishes.

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But it's not just zucchini; everything from sweet potatoes tobeets to jicama and daikon is spiralized these days, as reported by Epicurious, and substituted in all sorts ofdishes.

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For folks with gluten intolerance — and even those who just wantto get away from over-processed wheat pasta — this suddenly broadfield of substitutes offers the opportunity to indulge in dishesthat perhaps have been off the menu for years, as well as thechance to invent new recipes and add more vegetables into theirdiet.

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4. Turmeric offers a lot more than flavor

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Long known for its delicious flavor, turmeric can do more thanbrighten a dish; it's been used for more than4,000 years to treat a number of conditions. Studies have shownthat it has anti-inflammatory properties, can help fightinfections, arthritis and ulcerative colitis and, according toMemorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center, even assist in thebattle against cancer.

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3. Mocktails could tempt those trying to cut down onalcohol's calories

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Mocktails are just cocktails without the booze — but for folkslooking to cut calorie consumption by refraining from alcohol, theycan be tasty and festive at the same time without the dietaryconcerns introduced by fermentation.

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And for folks determined to start off the New Year by cuttingalcohol from their diets, whether for the short or the long term,the fact that even prominent bars and restaurants are starting tocater to abstainers by offering a selection of mocktails is awelcome encouragement.

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They do seem to be gaining steam, with both theNew York Times and the Wall Street Journal reporting on their prevalence in placesbetter known for serving the more potent versions.

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2. Organics lead to better health, and a healthierenvironment

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Although there's been considerable debate over whether organicfood is actually healthier, substantial research has been done onthe matter, and a study published in the British Journal ofNutrition, reported on earlier this year by NPR, has weighed in in favorof organics, finding that higher concentrations of nutrients existin organically grown vegetables.

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And if that's not enough, remember that organic foods won'tcontain pesticide residues (or at least, not as much asconventionally grown produce).

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Organic farming is also easier on the environment, since itabstains from pesticides and chemical fertilizers and insteademploys methods that restore nutrients to the land naturally.Ongoing USDA studies, as reported by the Washington Post last year,found numerous benefits to organic agriculture, including morefertile soil, less use of resources, and no contamination frompesticides.

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1. Ethical eating boosts humane treatment of farmanimals

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The elimination of inhumane confinement methods for farmanimals, as well as inhumane methods of slaughter, is a matter ofcommon sense.

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The high use of antibiotics in the feed of overcrowded farm animalsused to be justified by agribusinesses as cutting down on disease,but what it has done is the opposite, increasing the existence ofantibiotic-resistant bacteria that not only endanger people whenfound in meat, but also pass through animals' systems to presentthe potential for contamination of other food products, such aseggs, fruits and vegetables.

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According to the CDC, there are plenty of opportunities for contamination from the field to the henhouseand the slaughterhouse.

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Many of these can be eliminated by treating animals morehumanely, adhering to standards of cleanliness, eliminatinginhumane methods of confinement and increasing oversight ofslaughterhouses and processing plants to ensure contamination doesnot occur and diseased animals are not entering the food chain.

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