Employers have a conundrum: One-fifth of workers regret thehealth care benefit choices they make, but the same percentage ofworkers also concede they ignore any written educational materialsabout benefits their employers provided.

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Related: The benefits employees change jobsfor

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To make matters worse, according to Jellyvision’s 2017 ALEX Benefits Communication Survey,two-thirds don’t like in-person consultations -- not even if it’swithin a group or one-on-one with a benefits expert.

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So what’s an employer to do?

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“The challenge is most people don’t want ‘education’ onthese topics,” says Jellyvision chief executive Amanda Lannert. “Noone wakes up with a burning desire to learn about HDHPs. In ourexperience, people respond best to plain-English communication thatfeels like they’re talking about benefits with a friend -- ifbenefits were a thing friends ever talked about.”

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The good news is 82 percent of the 2,043 U.S. adults surveyed byHarris Poll say they’re satisfied with their employer’s benefitscommunication, and 86 percent feel their company has provided themwith enough information to make informed decisions. A majority (69percent) say they personally have spent either “a great deal” or “alot” of time learning about their company’s benefits offerings.

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Related: Half of employees don't understand their healthbenefits, poll says

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However, while 89 percent say they generally understand theirbenefit options, more than a few aren’t too sure about all of thedetails.

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For example, only 59 percent are correct in identifying the fullcost of their health care plan, including their contribution andtheir employer’s contribution, and half (50 percent) say they arenot knowledgeable about high-deductible health plans. More thanhalf (54 percent) are unsure whether they can make changes to theirinsurance during qualified life events, and 43 percent are unclearon where to direct their health insurance questions.

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“We think the number one biggest take-away of this entire surveyis… employees want your help when choosing their health plans,” theauthors write.

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Indeed, more than half (55 percent) of all employees whosecompany offers health insurance say they would like help from theiremployer when choosing a health plan. Roughly half (49 percent) saythe decision-making process is very stressful, and 36 percent feelthe open enrollment process at their company is extremelyconfusing.

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Related: 3 HSA facts employees should know

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Jellyvision’s survey asked respondents to react to a possiblerepeal of the Affordable Care Act, particularly as it relates toemployer-provided health insurance plans, and found a majority (61percent) don’t think a repeal would affect them personally.

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When asked about keeping certain provisions of the ACA, 80percent say it’s “absolutely essential” or “very important” to keepcoverage of preexisting conditions, 78 percent say that about freepreventative care, and 67 percent say that about coverage of adultchildren up to age 26.

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Katie Kuehner-Hebert

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in Running Springs, Calif. She has more than three decades of journalism experience, with particular expertise in employee benefits and other human resource topics.