The latest Republican effort to repeal/replace the Affordable Care Act, theCassidy-Graham bill, is meeting with some pretty heated rhetoric inopposition — on both sides of the aisle (at least outside ofCongress).

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Among other critiques, the Washington Post reports, the bill would “devolve federal healthspending and policy authority to states and could cause millions tolose health insurance.” And not every Republican is happy aboutit.

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Democrats, of course, are furious, particularly since theCongressional Budget Office has indicated that it won’t be able toprovide a full breakdown of fallout, should the bill become law,until next week — and that’s past the deadline Republicans have set forthemselves to pass the bill with a mere 51 votes. If they can’t ramthe bill through before September 30, they’ll have to get someDemocratic support for the measure — something that’s more in linewith pink elephants rather than gray ones.

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But the opposition had intended to hammer home figures that theybelieve will kill the bill among moderate Republicans — the numbersof people who would lose coverage, the contribution of the bill tothe deficit and just how high premiums would go under itsterms.

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Related: Employees' health care costs keeprising

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Huffington Postreports that a bipartisan group of governorshas already spoken out against the latest attempt to kill the ACA,sending a letter to Mitch McConnell, R-KY, Senate majority leader,calling for a bipartisan effort to change the health caresystem—not a piece of one-sided GOP legislation.

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The letter reads in part, “We ask you to support bipartisanefforts to bring stability and affordability to our insurancemarkets. Legislation should receive consideration under regularorder, including hearings in health committees and input from theappropriate health-related parties.”

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The governors add, “Improvements to our health insurance marketsshould control costs, stabilize the market, and positively impactcoverage and care of millions of Americans, including many who aredealing with mental illness, chronic health problems, and drugaddiction.”

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The Washington Post breakdown of the bill appears to confirm thatthis particular piece of legislation will do none of these. Infact, it says, “The proposal, crafted by Sens. Bill Cassidy, R-LA,Lindsey O. Graham, R-SC and Dean Heller, R-NV, essentially turnscontrol of the health care markets over to the states.”

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But rather than funding Medicaid and subsidies directly, thatmoney would be put into a block grant that a state could use todevelop any health-care system it wants — except for one, ifanother Republican senator has his way. That one health care systemthat’s not wanted, according to Huffington Post, is targeted by a proposedamendment from Sen. John Kennedy, R-LA, that would prevent anystate in the country from setting up a single-payer system.

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In addition, Medicaid expansion and subsidy funding, accordingto the breakdown, would be cut sharply compared to currentspending, going to zero in a decade.

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Very public opposition to the bill includes a dissection of thebill by Sen. Chris Murphy, D-CT, on Twitter — in which he calls the bill “anintellectual and moral garbage truck fire”—and another assault notjust on the bill but on one of the writers of the bill by JimmyKimmel.

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And while in their quest to beat the Sept. 30 deadline,Republicans are pressuring the holdouts from last time, withparticular efforts aimed at Sen. LisaMurkowski, R-AK, the public might once again turn the tide theother way—particularly if enough late-night TV viewers werewatching Kimmel, who had gone public in June with the news that hisnewborn son had a serious health condition—and would have diedcould his parents not have afforded his care. Cassidy publicly saidat the time that any health care bill that passed should have topass the “Jimmy Kimmel test,” which breaks down to “No familyshould be denied medical care, emergency or otherwise, because theycan’t afford it.”

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In Kimmel’s latest weigh-in on the health care law,however, he went directly after Cassidy, saying, “Not only did BillCassidy fail the Jimmy Kimmel test, he failed the Bill Cassidytest.”

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“This guy, Bill Cassidy, just lied to my face,” Kimmel said onhis program, referring to the latest GOP health care billiteration. Talking about the three Republicans who voted againstthe last attempt to kill the ACA (John McCain, R-AZ, Murkowski andSusan Collins, R-ME), Kimmel said, “I hope they have the courageand good sense to do that again with this one because these otherguys who claim they want Americans to have better health care ...they’re trying to sneak this scam of a bill they cooked up in.” Headded, “They don’t even want you to see it.”

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