With all the focus on the tax reform bill and the repeal of theindividual health insurance mandate, theHealth Insurance Tax has slipped under theradar.

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HIT, as it’s known, was passed in the original Affordable CareAct and took effect in 2014 to help fund the ACA. The tax wasapplied to health insurance plans purchased by small businessowners, but Congress passed a one-year moratorium on it. The thingis, it affects everyone, according to a KTVN report, and it’s goingto cost them—and some of them a lot—when it returns in 2018.

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The report quotes Reno health insurance consultant Gene Furr,who represents the nonpartisan Northern Nevada Association ofHealth Underwriters, saying about the return of HIT, “Anyone whopurchases an individual policy, anyone who purchases a group healthplan through their employer is going to be impacted. Even seniorsare impacted.”

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In fact, the return of HIT could also put the kibosh on smallbusiness growth, as a report from KTUU indicates. The report quotesLinda Peters, the owner and general manager of ProComm Alaska,saying, “It actually puts pressure on me to actually not grow,don’t hire new people, don’t increase benefits, don’t increase paidtime off, don’t increase salaries. Where’s that money going to comefrom? My choices are this: I pass it on to my employees or I passit on to my customers.”

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HIT can cause so much trouble because it’s going to raise theprice of health coverage—already well beyond the reach of many—as a3–6 percent charge on top of any business-provided plans that costmore than the national average.

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And for individuals? The KTVN report cites the Association ofHealth Underwriters saying it will affect half of all Nevadans, andthe 3 percent rise in premiums “pales to what it will cost in realdollars.” Says the report, “An individual will have to shell outanother $215 a year. A family of four? $500. As Furr said, ‘That's$500 a year in additional in additional cost on a product that'salready extremely expensive.’”

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Businesses there will be in trouble, too, with Zach Cage, ownerof The Brewers Cabinet beer production plant, saying in the reportthat his business is about to be crippled. “We see it impacting notjust our employees which are the next generation, but also theindustry and the local area, which we're passionate about,” he’squoted saying.

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If another moratorium on HIT isn’t put in place, lots of peoplewill be paying more for coverage on top of rates that have alreadybeen hiked to cover the unpredictability of the health insurancemarkets under the Trump administration.

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There actually is a bill in the works, called the “HealthcareTax Relief Act,” introduced to postpone HIT yet again, butcurrently Congress has other things on its mind; the bill is noteven scheduled for a vote.

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Furr says in the report that taxpayers “can talk to theircongressman. But they’re not that aware of it. This is one of thosetaxes...like everything else, it’s typically hidden." But nothidden for long, the report notes, “once the costs show up oninsurance bills.”

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