The World Economic Forum at Davos is a font of news—and one hottopic is the supplanting of jobs by tech and AI. That newsis not good for the people who depend on those jobs, particularlysince there’s no pipeline of new jobs coming to take theirplace.

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The Huffington Post reports that one Davos panel titled “Putting jobs out of work”refers to a McKinsey estimate that over the next 10 or so years, athird of all workers in Germany and the U.S. may need to find workin new occupations.

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Related: AI advances will require new laws,regulations

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The rise of automation and its supplanting of jobs done bypeople was highlighted this week by Amazon’s rollout of its firstcashierless store. And while opinion is divided about just how manyjobs will disappear, and at which skill levels, the end result isthat a lot of jobs are going to vanish—and they won’t be comingback. Jobs most threatened by tech that were discussed at the panelincluded cashiers, of course, thanks to Amazon, and truck driverswith the eventual adoption of driverless trucks.

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“I think we’re facing a crisis we aren’t talking about,” ArlieHochschild, professor of sociology at Cal Berkeley, is quotedsaying. But what’s also not being talked about is how the great jobvanishing act will affect women, who stand to lose adisproportionate number of jobs.

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Another Huffington Post report says that nearly 60 percent of the jobs at risk ofreplacement by technology are held by women. The “Towards aReskilling Revolution” reportreleased at Davos analyzed nearly 1,000 jobs across the U.S.economy, and its conclusions, says HuffPo, “are bleak.”

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The numbers are truly scary: an expected 1.4 million U.S. jobswill be at risk from technology and other factors between now and2026. And 56 percent of those jobs are held by women—who alreadydeal with an increasing gender gap and facing a 217-year wait to have the same job and wageopportunities as men.

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It’s not just male-dominated factory jobs at risk, according toSaadia Zahidi, head of education, gender and work at WEF, who saysin the report that “[t]he narrative tends to focus on male,blue-collar factory workers, for example. But there are also anumber of very female-dominated roles like secretaries andadministrative assistants that are facing displacement”—almost164,000 female secretaries are at risk, the report says, comparedwith 90,000 at-risk male assembly line workers.

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Then there’s retail, with salespeople and cashiers—nearly 74percent of the latter female—the top two most common jobs. Togetherthey account for some 7.8 million workers.

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