Companies would do well to consider adding telecommuting as an option, but such arrangements need to be done right. (Photo: Shutterstock)

In traffic-dense cities especially, work-from-home options can be the make-or-break factor in a job offer. Seventy-seven percent of respondents in a recent Robert Half survey said they’d be more likely to accept a job if working remotely was an option.

“High employment levels mean more people are on the roads traveling to and from their jobs, which increases traffic and makes working remotely more appealing,” said Paul McDonald, senior executive director for Robert Half. “Employees want the ability to telecommute for various reasons — for some it’s flexibility in their schedule, for others it’s about saving time and money.”

Related: The (long) history of working from home

Companies would do well to consider adding telecommuting as an option, but such arrangements need to be done right to ensure it doesn’t have a negative impact on employee relationships and to prevent employees from abusing the privilege.

“Work-from-home arrangements are most successful when employers set clear parameters and invest in technology, such as videoconferencing, to help remote personnel feel like they are part of the team,” McDonald said.

So where and why is remote work most popular? Take a look: