Some of the issues plaguing states with poor health care include the overall health of the population in the area, the presence of more advanced medical equipment and ignorance of the best treatments available. (Photo: Shutterstock)

The Centers for Disease Control say that 88.1 percent of the U.S. population has somewhere to go regularly for medical care—but that doesn't mean the care they receive is good, or that they can actually afford it.

That's according to WalletHub, which took a look at all 50 states and the District of Columbia to see where people are best (and worst) off when seeking care for a health problem. Some of the issues they face include the overall health of the population in the area, the presence of more advanced medical equipment and ignorance of the best treatments available for what ails them—all of which can drive up costs.

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