Man sleeping at work Lack ofsleep is more prominent at the lower echelons ofemployment–less than 54 percent of entry-level employeesbeing satisfied with their sleep. (Photo: Shutterstock)

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It might not seem like a big deal, but employers need to beconcerned about whether their employees are able to get enough sleep.

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A study of employees' sleep and fatigue from theSleep Judge, highlights the health problems that can be caused bylack of sleep—everything from heart disease to mental healthissues. But if that's not enough to get employers' attention,there's this: lack of sleep can impact employee retention.

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As it turns out, professionals who are unhappy with theamount/quality of their sleep are much more likely to jump ship insearch of another job, with 39 percent on theprowl for a new place to park their desk blotters. Among those whowere satisfied with their sleep, only 21.3 percent—a high enoughnumber as it is—were hunting for a new job.

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Related: A third of Americans don't sleepenough

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The trend is particularly marked in the retail and technologysectors, in which 53.5 percent and 52.4 percent, respectively, arejob-hunting. The report suggests that retail employers, alreadysuffering from high turnover rates, would be well advised to checkout employee fatigue among their crews to see what could be done toimprove the situation. Ditto for tech companies, since burnoutfigures so prominently among the industry's challenges.

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While nowhere near as many workers are job-hunting in othersectors—maybe they're too tired to look for a new job?—beware ofkeeping employees on a schedule of more than five days of work perweek. The report warns that “among those who spent six or moreworkdays feeling tired each week, over half were looking fordifferent work.”

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Lack of sleep is also more prominent at the lower echelons ofemployment, with less than 54 percent of entry-level employeesbeing satisfied with their sleep—compared with 76.9 percent ofexecutives, who despite the reputation for hard-charging top brassare satisfied with theirs. Says the study, “If people inhigh-ranking positions shoulder more responsibilities than theaverage employee, they don't seem to compromise sleep to doso.”

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Oh, and forget the old rah-rah, take-one-for-the-teammotivational speeches as a cure for exhaustion. The study alsofinds that tired employees just aren't moved to inspiration bycompany leadership, with fewer than half of workers who are tired 5or more days a week saying that they're inspired by leadership.

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In fact, consider this disturbing statistic: another recentstudy, the report says, “found that 63 percent of workers distrusttheir company's chief executive.” Now that's a nightmare you don'twant at your place of business.

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