Military person holding help wanted sign Employers should consider offering positions to militaryspouses that do not require a specific location and can have moreflexible hours. (Photo: Shutterstock)

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It can be challenging for military spouses to find good jobs, consideringthe frequent redeployment moves of their families. But with theright resources and strategies, spouses can successfully leveragethe military perspective to their advantage, according to theMilitary Spouse Employment Survey 2019,released by Monster and Military.com ahead of National MilitarySpouse Appreciation Day on Friday.

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A majority (74 percent) of the 305 military spouses polled saythey face significant challenges in finding employment after one oftheir redeployment moves. As such, seven in 10 (71 percent) find itdifficult to establish a clear career path and believe achievingupward mobility is difficult with the constant moves.

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Related: Lack of economic stability offers challenges formilitary families

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Two-thirds (65 percent) believe it's tough to find a job thattakes their military lifestyle into account, and half of themilitary spouses who are currently working (52 percent) feel theyare underemployed.

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“Despite the challenges, there are certain approaches that willmake it easier for military spouses to find a job, and most spouseshave an overall optimistic outlook for their career prospects,” theauthors write.

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Specifically, job placements/recruiters (57 percent),company-sponsored military-hiring programs (57 percent) andnetworking opportunities specifically for military spouses (50percent) would make it easier for military spouses to find jobs,the respondents say.

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“Military spouses don't want to be viewed as a specialcause–however, they hope an employer would take their familysituation into consideration and provide accommodations like moreflexibility when their skills and career interests match a jobopening,” the authors write.

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Employers should consider offering positions to military spousesthat do not require a specific location and can have more flexiblehours, the two organizations advise.

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“By creating more versatile, portable positions, jobs can movewith the spouse as they relocate with the military,” the authorswrite. “Employers will be better able to retain military spouseswhen they relocate.”

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Many of the respondents believe the military perspective is anasset that employers should consider: 67 percent ultimately believebeing a military spouse has positively affected their workopportunities, and 75 percent are positive or somewhat positiveabout their job prospects.

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Both Monster and Military.com say they want to help militaryspouses find the right positions that best utilize theirexperiences and skills, and the two organizations also want to helpemployers hire such people.

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“As an underutilized talent pool in today's workforce, militaryspouses can apply invaluable expertise to a variety of positions,including short-term contracts and long-term salaried positions,”the authors write.

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“Our focus is to help bridge the gap between employers and jobcandidates, as well as to help organizations fill open positionswith dynamic, capable talent,” they add. “And, we strongly believethe wives, husbands and partners of members of the military arejust that.”

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Katie Kuehner-Hebert

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in Running Springs, Calif. She has more than three decades of journalism experience, with particular expertise in employee benefits and other human resource topics.