Graduates with diplomas More thanhalf of all recent graduates expect that it will take less than oneto two months to find a full-time job. (Photo:Shutterstock)

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Most of this year's college graduates expect to land a jobrather quickly—but many are going to keep their current side gigsto make ends meet, according to Monster's Graduation Survey 2019.

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Monster polled 350 18- to 26-year-olds graduating thisyear with either a bachelor's degree, vocational or technicaldegree, associate degree, master's degree, doctoral or professionaldegree. The survey found that more than half of all of therespondents (59 percent) expect that it will take less than one totwo months to find a full-time job—and of those, more than aquarter (28 percent) expect it to take less than one month.

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Related: How prepared are college grads for the jobmarket?

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More women than men are confident they can get a job in lessthan one month (33 percent vs. 23 percent), and the youngestgraduates, ages 18 to 20, are more confident than the otherrespondents, ages 21 to 26.

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But that doesn't mean graduates are going to ditch the side jobsmany currently have, according to the survey. Nearly two-thirds ofthe respondents (65 percent) currently have a side gig and ofthose, 30 percent say they plan to keep their side gig even afteraccepting something more permanent.

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More than half of all of the respondents (47 percent) plan totarget specific employers of interest, and slightly less (43percent) plan to leverage networking contacts and otherword-of-mouth channels. The third most-likely source (35 percent)are job boards, and as for social media, men are more likely torely on Instagram as a resource than women (34 percent vs. 24percent).

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Starting salary and location tie for being the most importantfactors during the job search process (both at 32 percent), whilelower on the graduates' list of priorities are company perks (14percent), company mission/values (11 percent) and size of company(9 percent).

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While most graduates are optimistic about their job prospects,many have some jitters about the actual interview process. More than half (55 percent)say they are feeling stressed about taking a job assessment to seeif the job is the right fit and 51 percent are concerned aboutwhether they are going to wear the appropriate outfit to anin-person interview. Interestingly, men are feeling more stressedabout their attire than women (57 percent vs. 46 percent).

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Katie Kuehner-Hebert

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in Running Springs, Calif. She has more than three decades of journalism experience, with particular expertise in employee benefits and other human resource topics.