Woman waiting in doctor's office

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When it comes to their health, women are getting fewer servicesbut paying more.

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According to research from the Kaiser Family Foundation in partnership withthe Journal of the American Medical Association, women spendsignificantly more on annual health care than men: women aged 19 to34 spent an average of $3,402 in 2015, compared to just $1,891 formen.

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Despite these numbers (or perhaps because of them), women areactually more likely to be skipping out on preventive services andmedical treatment. They're also more likely to have a pre-existing condition and, consequently,express more concern about the possibility of ACA repeal.

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Take a look at the infographic below (click to enlarge) for moreinsights into the unique barriers to women's health care.

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Barriers to women's health infographic

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Emily Payne

Emily Payne is director, content analytics for ALM's Business & Finance Markets and former managing editor for BenefitsPRO. A Wisconsin native, she has spent the past decade writing and editing for various athletic and fitness publications. She holds an English degree and Business certificate from the University of Wisconsin.