ACA Magnifying Glass When askedwhat best describes their feelings about the ACA today, 43 percentsay that something should be done to lower the cost of ACAcoverage. (Photo: Getty)

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As fate of the Affordable Care Act is decided with the landmarkcase, Texas v. United States – and as a number of Democraticpresidential candidates argue for Medicare for All, people with current ACAcoverage weigh in on how they feel about health care in eHealth'ssurvey report, "ACA Consumers on the Future of Coverage."

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eHealth conducted a voluntary survey and received responses from801 individuals who bought ACA-compliant individual or familyhealth insurance plans from eHealth, some with and some withoutgovernment subsidies. Respondents shared their sentiments about theACA, coverage options if the ACA were invalidated, and political proposalstouching on Medicare and the future of health care in the U.S.

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Related: ACA winning out over Medicare for All amongDemocrat voters

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When asked what best describes their feelings about the ACAtoday, 43 percent say that something should be done to lower thecost of ACA coverage; 19 percent are happy with the ACA as it is;17 percent think the ACA should be thrown out entirely; 14 percentwant ACA plans to have broader provider networks.

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Not surprisingly, the unsubsidized are more likely to say costsshould be reduced: 47 percent of those not receiving governmentpremium subsidies say that costs should be lowered, compared to 35percent of those receiving government premium subsidies.

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Subsidy recipients are more likely to be happy with the ACA asit is: 29 percent report satisfaction, compared to 15 percent ofthose not receiving subsidies.

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When asked if the ACA were to be scrapped and their plandiscontinued, what would they do for coverage, 36 percent say theywould look for less costly alternatives like short-term coverage;31 percent say they would go uninsured; and 20 percent say theywould enroll in employer-based coverage.

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Two-thirds of subsidy recipients say they would go uninsuredwithout the ACA: 66 percent of respondents receiving governmentpremium subsidies say they will likely go uninsured if the ACA wasscrapped and their plan canceled, compared to 16 percent of theunsubsidized.

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When asked if the ACA were to be revised, which of the elementsshould be retained, 77 percent would retain coverage forpre-existing conditions; 65 percent would retain coverage formental health care; 63 percent would retain maternity coverage; 57percent would retain birth control coverage; 57 percent wouldretain premium subsidies; and 47 percent would retain coverage fordrug and alcohol treatment.

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When asked should all Americans have access to Medicare orMedicare-like coverage, 59 percent percent say yes to all; 8percent say they do not believe all Americans should have access;21 percent say only people age 55 and older should have access toMedicare, on a buy-in basis; and 11 percent weren't sure.

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Younger consumers are more likely to support expansion ofMedicare-like coverage: 67 percent of people age 25 to 34 say thatall Americans should have access to Medicare or Medicare-likecoverage, compared to 46 percent of people age 55 to 64.

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Older adults more likely to support Medicare buy-in: Consumersage 55 to 64 are more likely to support buy-in access to Medicareat age 55 and older than people age 25 to 34 (36 percent vs. 13percent).

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A strong majority of ACA enrollee voters consider health care atop factor in their votes for the 2020 election: 14 percent sayhealth care is their top concern when it comes to voting in 2020,and 70 percent say that it is within their top three concerns,though it wasn't their top concern. However, 11 percent say theyworry most about having access to network doctors andhospitals.

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About 8.7 million people enrolled in health plans for 2019through the federal HealthCare.gov, a decline of about 4 percentfrom 2018, according to the Centers for Medicare and MedicaidServices.

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Katie Kuehner-Hebert

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in Running Springs, Calif. She has more than three decades of journalism experience, with particular expertise in employee benefits and other human resource topics.