Man working in PJs To help remoteworkers maintain work/life boundaries, encourage them to setexpectations regarding theiravailability and schedule regular blocks of timeaway in their calendar. (Photo: Shutterstock)

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After working all day remotely via email and the internet, it can bea challenge not to continue being online, so say 200 full-timeremote workers responding to a Remote.co survey.

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Indeed, unplugging after work hours is the biggest painpoint remote workers encounter when working in their virtualenvironment, garnering the highest percentage–40 percent–for therespondents' top challenge.

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Other challenges for remote workers include dealing withnon-work distractions (32 percent), developing strong relationshipswith coworkers (25 percent), loneliness (23 percent),troubleshooting technology problems (21 percent) and working acrossdifferent time zones (19 percent).

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Related: 5 tips for managing remote work arrangements, froman expert

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"One of the biggest misconceptions about remote workers is thatthey're not actually working, or that they're less productive thantheir in-office counterparts," says Sara Sutton, founder/CEO ofRemote.co and FlexJobs.

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"As multiple studies confirm, though, remote workers tend to notonly be more productive, but also happier and more engaged at theirjobs," Sutton says. "Disconnecting from work when you have a homeoffice can be difficult, though. Managers of remote workers need toreally encourage their teams to develop healthy boundaries betweenhome and office — and model that behavior for them as well."

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Remote.co recommends that remote workers adopt the followingstrategies: set expectations regarding their availability; scheduleregular blocks of time away in their calendar; have anaccountability partner; embrace their hobbies; tackle their biggestor most urgent to-dos sans tech; have a contingency plan in place;and "focus on being present for those around you."

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"While unplugging from work when you work from home can betricky, coming up with a few strategies to help you 'turn off' cango a long way in finding a better balance between your job and yourlife," Sutton says.

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Other key survey findings include:

  • 83 percent of the remote worker respondents say they couldn'timagine returning to an on-site office.
  • 38 percent worked remotely more this year compared to lastyear, and 55 percent worked remotely the same amount this year aslast year.
  • Only 5 percent worry a lot that working remotely willnegatively impact their career progression.
  • 94 percent of remote workers work primarily from their homeoffices (vs. coworking spaces, libraries, or coffee shops).
  • 46 percent never have to travel for work-related events, 32percent travel one or two times a year, 13 percent travel three tofour times a year, and 9% travel five times or more each year.
  • 59 percent say working from home is very or somewhat conduciveto developing meaningful relationships with coworkers.
  • 13 percent of full-time remote workers plan to take more thanfour weeks of vacation this year.

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Katie Kuehner-Hebert

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in Running Springs, Calif. She has more than three decades of journalism experience, with particular expertise in employee benefits and other human resource topics.