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Woman working at table Over the past year, we have seen an increase in musculoskeletal issues as most at-home or remote work stations take the form of dining room tables and kitchen countertops designed for eating rather than eight-hour workdays.

Many Americans have been working remotely for over a year, with an increasing number of employers shifting to fully remote or hybrid work models. This unanticipated consequence of the pandemic has been a welcomed one for some – with several recent surveys, including one from FlexJobs, highlighting a majority of employees prefer remote work to in-person. It’s clear that remote work is not a trend – it is here to stay, removing old barriers that formerly dictated where people live and how their work gets done. As employers adjust to this new normal, the challenge of maintaining workers’ physical and mental wellbeing should be a priority in order to ensure a productive workforce.

Factoring ergonomics into the evolving remote work culture is essential. Before the pandemic, the majority of American workers did not have proper remote work setups at home. However, over the past year, we have seen an increase in musculoskeletal issues as most at-home or remote work stations take the form of dining room tables and kitchen countertops designed for eating rather than eight-hour workdays.

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