You might think that the turn of the calendar from one year tothe next would make people conscious of the passage of time—and,thus, more concerned with their future retirement.

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Not so, according to the seventh annual New Year’s ResolutionSurvey from Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America.Instead, people are focusing more on their health, makingresolutions that top all otherconcerns but faith and family.

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Nearly half (44 percent) of respondents reported their top focusfor 2016 will be on health/wellness. Financial stability trailed bya hefty margin, at just 29 percent, while career/employment, at 13percent, education, at 9 percent, and entertainment/leisure, at apaltry five percent, came in considerably farther behind.

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Forty-three percent of respondents said that they’re most likely(oh, those optimists!) to make and keep their resolution ofdiet/exercise, while 41 percent (still dreaming of post-holidaysales, no doubt) said they’d manage money better in the year tocome.

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Read: 6 industry execs on what to expect in2016

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And nearly one out of every three didn’t even bother to includefinancial planning in their resolutions because of this dismalview: they “don’t make enough money to worry about it.”

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That gloomy outlook arises out of people’s fears. “We know fromour research that financial health weighs heavily on people’sminds,” said Katie Libbe, Allianz Life vice president of consumerinsights. Libbe added, “[S]tagnant wages were a top concern and onein three respondents reported they fear another major recession mayhappen in 2016.”

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Even though they’re not planning (financially) for the future,respondents believe the top three things that could improve theirfinances in 2016 are building their savings for emergencies, payingoff credit card debt, and making a budget.

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And even though they’re ostensibly focused on their health, atelling factor of where their thoughts really are is the fact that,if offered free access to professional guidance, more respondentschose a financial professional (37 percent) than anutritionist/dietician (28 percent) or a personal trainer (23percent).

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And they obviously recognize that they have some problems. Someof the top problems cited were: spending too much money on things“I don’t need” (29 percent); saving some money, “but not as much asI could” (28 percent); not saving any money (26 percent) andspending “more than I make” (19 percent).

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No wonder they’re not thinking about retirement….

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