(Bloomberg) -- Premiums for the most popular type of insuranceplans sold through Obamacare’s marketplaces will risefaster in 2017 than in recent years, according to a study releasedWednesday.

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Related: States embracing Medicaid expansion seeless debt sent to collection

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Consumer payments for the two lowest-cost “silver” plans willrise by an average of 10 percent to 11 percent next year, accordingto the study from the Kaiser Family Foundation that analyzedinformation from 14 major U.S. cities. Silver plans areselected by about 68 percent of Affordable Care Act enrollees,according to the study, and annual increases in the same plans hadaveraged about 5 percent.

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Related: Turning the ship on rising health carecosts

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The acceleration is due in part to the conclusion of anObamacare program that transferred funds from insurers in theemployer market to exchange insurers, holding down premiums by 4percent to 6 percent, said Cynthia Cox, a Kaiser associate directorof health reform and private insurance who led the study. Insurancecompanies also underestimated the number of enrollees and theircosts, she said.

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“It turns out a number of insurance companies just guessedwrong,” she said. “They guessed too low and they lost of a lot ofmoney.”

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Many people have enrolled in Obamacare with pre-existing medicalconditions, driving up insurer costs, while enrollment for theyoung and healthy has been below expectations, said MitchellMorris, global leader for the health-care sector at DeloitteConsulting.

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“That skews the pool to those who use more resources” Morrissaid. “You need everybody in the pool -- the healthy people and thesick people.”

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UnitedHealth Group Inc. and Humana Inc. have both exited someObamacare markets because of losses on the individual exchanges.The study found that while insurer participation in the citiesanalyzed will be slightly lower in 2017, the decrease inparticipation is mostly due to the departure of UnitedHealth.

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The analysis was based on proposed rate filings in states wherecomplete information was available. Most customers who receivepremium subsidies might avoid rate increases by shopping forsuppliers, according to the study. The 10 percent jump is weightedby 2016 state marketplace enrollment but higher this year than inthe previous years, according to the study.

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Benjamin Wakana, a spokesman for the Health and Human ServicesDepartment, said in an e-mail that consumers will end up payingsmaller increases than the proposed prices.

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“This is just the beginning of the rates process, and despiteheadlines suggesting double digit increases, proposed rates aren’twhat most consumers actually pay because the vast majority ofconsumers qualify for tax credits that reduce the cost of coveragebelow the sticker price, and people can shop around and findcoverage that fits their needs and budget.”

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