They may hope for retirement by 65, but they don’texpect it.

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An AARP survey has found that, while workers 35 and over arehoping that they can leave their desks behind by 65, they don’treally think it’ll happen.

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Instead, while 87 percent of those surveyed who are working fulltime say they want to retire someday, and nearly 70 percent ofthose hoping to retire want to do so by age 65, just over halfdon't expect to retire—either by 65 or at any age.

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Related: Longer lifespans too expensive, workersfear

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That depressing statistic is actually in line with the Bureau ofLabor Statistics, which predicts that labor force participationamong 65–74-year-olds will hit 32 percent by 2022, up from 20percent in 2002.

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Even more depressing, although the group that wants to retireacknowledges that they will be working longer, fewer than one infive people across the GenXer and boomer demographics say that thething that motivates them to get up in themorning is going to a job that fulfills them.

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So if they’re not getting up for the job, what’s propellingpeople out of bed in the morning? A third (33 percent) aremotivated by spending time with friends or family, but lack ofmoney interferes with other interests, such as volunteering ordonating to a cause (69 percent), or world travel (58 percent).

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And people really aren’t all that fond of their jobs; 49 percentof those who are working said they’d take a different kind of jobif they could. The most popular alternatives? Something that helpsor teaches others (30 percent) and something creative or artistic(25 percent).

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If they ever get to retire, though, they’re not planning onlounging around in bed; 85 percent said they’d like to travel,while 76 percent would pursue a passion and 69 percent wouldvolunteer.

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Not only are people worried about retirement (or its absence),about half of those 35 and older lie awake at night about moneyworries. And instead of counting sheep (or maybe because they’recounting nonexistent dollars and running out of them), they’re alsofretting about physical health challenges (42 percent),relationship issues (22 percent) and—what else? Work—20percent.

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A third feel their health will be the most important challengethey face in the next five years (34 percent), while others feeltheir most important challenge will be related to their children(13 percent), their work (10 percent), (re)discovering theirpurpose (9 percent), their home (9 percent) or their romanticrelationships (8 percent). And 62 percent dread, in the next 5–10years, having health problems; 59 percent, losing someone theylove; and 55 percent, having less money.

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