The Bernie Sanders revolution will continue — at least inColorado.

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Activists campaigning for a single-payer health caresystem in the Rocky Mountain State are reaching out tothe former presidential hopeful for help in its efforts to get thegroundbreaking policy approved via referendum this November.

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Leaders of the initiative, ColoradoCare, tell news partnersColorado Public Radio and Kaiser Health Newsthey're in talks with the Bernie Sanders team, hoping that America’s mostpopular Democratic Socialist can help garner support for thereferendum, which will be included on the presidential electionballot.

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“The last poll showed 60 percent of millennials supportColoradoCare,” T.R. Reid, one of the campaign organizers, told thenews site. “Those are Bernie people and if he can turn them out tovote, we win.”

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Sanders is by far the most successful presidential candidate toadvocate for a single-payer healthsystem.

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Although many Democrats, including President Obama, haveexpressed support for the concept of a system resembling that ofmost other western countries, the political realities in the U.S.tend to force even very liberal politicians to put aside the dreamof single-payer in favor of a policy that maintains the country’svast, for-profit health insurance industry. Hence, the AffordableCare Act.

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The Democratic presidential primary, however, suggested thatthere was a much greater appetite for a fundamental reform of thehealth care system among Democrats and liberal-leaning independentsthan party leaders likely realized.

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Hillary Clinton was repeatedly put on the defensive over herlack of support for a single-payer solution. As a result, herposition on health care gradually shifted to the left throughoutthe primary. Most notably, she announced support for allowingpeople to opt into Medicare at age 55 and said she would supportthe creation of a “public option” government-run insurance programthat would compete with private plans.

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In Sanders’ own state, Vermont, the Democratic governor andstate legislators explored setting up a single-payer system shortlyafter the implementation of the ACA in 2014. However, that effortwas abandoned at the end of that year, when Gov. Peter Shumlinconceded that the state didn’t have the funds necessary to put sucha program in place.

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ColoradoCare seeks to address the financing issue head on bylevying a tax on employees and companies. If approved, the plan isanticipated to cost $38 billion a year.

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Obviously, that price tag is enough to scare away many would-besympathizers of single-payer and has divided Democrats in Colorado.Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper is opposed.

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Supporters of the plan, however, point out that the big taxincrease will be offset by the elimination of the thousands ofdollars a year in private health care costs that currently burdenindividuals and businesses.

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A poll conducted in June found majority support for the planamong Colorado voters.

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