Millennials are the masters of the universe — the gig universe,that is.

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Even as all generations seem to be increasing their venturesinto the world of the side job, millennials are really pursuinggigs with a vengeance.

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Related: Majority of ex-freelancers say they wouldn't do itagain

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That’s according to a CareerBuilder survey that found that,while workers of all income levels are taking on side work and 29percent of workers overall have a side hustle, millennials aredoing the most to nail those extra snippets of income.

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While 19 percent of workers 55 and older are landing gigs, alongwith 22 percent of those 45-54 and 29 percent of those 35-44, theyounger folks are out chasing jobs in far greater numbers: 44percent of those aged 25-34 and 39 percent of those 18-24 have aside gig.

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And about those income levels: You might think that folks makingmore than $75,000 wouldn’t feel the need to hit the road for Uberor Lyft, or take on some other gig, but 18 percent of them aredoing just that. Even more surprising is that 12 percent of thosemaking more than $100,000 currently have a gig outside of theirfull time job. This is compared to a third of workers making below$50,000 (34 percent) and 34 percent earning below $35,000.

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The trend is most common among workers in the south, where 34percent of workers have side gigs. In the west, just 29 percent areout hustling after office hours, while 27 percent are out chasingrainbows in the Midwest and 23 percent of northeasterners arelooking for additional income on the side.

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Related: Freelance nation

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So what are all these workers doing outside of their day jobs?Broken down by industry, leisure and hospitality (34 percent);retail (33 percent); and transportation (32 percent) workers aremost likely to have a side gig, followed by health care, at 30percent; sales, 30 percent; IT, 27 percent; financial services, 24percent; and manufacturing, 19 percent.

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The most common gigs are survey taker; childcare, consultant,freelance writer, house sitter, blogger, bartender,photographer/videographer, website designer, and tutor. Moreoddball gigs include mystery shopper, BBQ contest official,firewood processor, trailer checker and tattoo apprentice.

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Overall, workers who have a side hustle are more passionateabout their day jobs (39 percent) than their side hustles (36percent). And 71 percent of workers with a side hustle do not wantto turn their side gig into their day job and 76 percent don't planto own their own business in the future.

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Ironically, what many are doing to relieve the boredom or dragof their day jobs could turn out to be a big lure for recruiters.While 80 percent of gig workers say their day jobs are not theirdream jobs, and 44 percent say they don't think they ever will bein a dream job, CareerBuilder found that those side jobs do boostthe attraction of a gig worker’s resume.

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Related: 5 ways employers can tap into the freelancenetwork

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“Side hustles not only provide financial benefits to workers,but they make them more attractive candidates to employers,especially in a competitive job market,” Rosemary Haefner, chiefhuman resources officer at CareerBuilder, said in a statement. Sheadded, “When you’re applying to jobs, especially when you’re at thestart of your career, other applicants could have more experiencein your particular field. If you bring more skill sets to the tableand have a unique perspective on how things can be done, you’resure to stand out from the crowd and be seen as a valuablepotential hire.”

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