A key moderate Republican senator said on Sunday she’s waitingfor a Congressional Budget Office score to finalize her position onthe Senate bill to repeal and replace Obamacare, and that she hasconcerns about the measure’s impact on older and ruralAmericans.

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Related: Dems try to revive health bill fight as GOP aimsfor vote

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“I have very serious concerns about the bill,” Senator SusanCollins of Maine said on ABC’s “This Week.” The CBO score “will beso important,” she said.

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Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday unveiled along-awaited proposal to replace the health-care reforms enacted byPresident Barack Obama. The draft bill would cut Medicaid for thepoor and disabled by some $800 billion and scale back subsidiesdesigned to help people afford coverage. The plan also wouldprovide an additional $50 billion over four years to stabilizeinsurance exchanges.

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The Senate is on track to start procedural votes on Wednesday,Texas Senator John Cornyn, the Republican whip, told reporters inColorado at a donor summit for the Koch political network. Passingthe bill won’t get any easier by delaying it, he said.

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“If people want to get to ‘yes,’ then you can have good-faithnegotiation and get them there. But it’s going to be close,” saidCornyn.

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Related: Four GOP senators spurn health plan aimed atunifying party

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Collins said she’s “very concerned” about cuts in coverage forolder people with serious, chronic illnesses and the impact onlower-income Americans, as well as the cuts in funding for ruralhospitals and nursing homes through Medicaid reductions.

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Medicaid concerns

“Based on what I’ve seen, given the inflation rate that would beapplied in the outer years to the Medicaid program, the Senate billis going to have more impact on the Medicaid program than even theHouse bill,” she said. Seven or eight Republican senators have beenmeeting under the leadership of Rob Portman of Ohio to expressconcern about Medicaid, Collins added.

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Related: Two studies look at Medicaid expansion pros,cons

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Also on ABC, Kellyanne Conway, an adviser to President DonaldTrump, said the reduction in Medicaid funding wasn’t a “cut” but anassumption of a slower rate of growth in future.

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Only a few hours after the bill was released, four conservativeSenators led by Rand Paul of Kentucky announced that they’ll need ahost of changes to get to “yes.” On Friday, Dean Heller of Nevadaadded his name to the dissenters, saying the plan would take awayinsurance from too many people in his state.

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Heller, who’s up for re-election in 2018, stood with his state’sRepublican governor, Brian Sandoval, in announcing his opposition.On Sunday, Governor John Kasich of Ohio, another Republican, alsoopposed the measure. “I don’t think the bill is adequate,” Kasichsaid on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

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‘Promised too much’

Paul said on ABC that the Republicans “promised too much” andthat “there’s no way the Republican bill brings down premiums.” Hesaid if McConnell can’t get the required votes to pass the bill, hecould support an effort that focuses on repealing Obamacare.

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Related: How killing Obamacare might save some of Obamacare,for a while

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McConnell can only afford to lose two Republican votes amidunanimous Democratic opposition to the health-care bill. Moderatesincluding Collins and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska are also concernedabout cuts to funding for Planned Parenthood, the women’s healthclinics. Collins said she is “optimistic we’ll prevail on thatissue.” Murkowski said in a statement on Thursday that she will“crunch the numbers.”

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McConnell has said he wants the chamber to vote on the measurenext week, after an open-amendment process. Lawmakers leave townthe following week for an Independence Day recess, but even someRepublicans are urging him to slow down.

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Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, part of the faction thatthinks the bill doesn’t go far enough in rolling back Obamacare,said he’d like to delay a vote.

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‘Let’s not rush’

“Let’s not rush this process,” Johnson said on NBC’s “Meet thePress.” “Let’s have the integrity to show the American people whatit is.’’

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Related: Sanders signals backing of Senate slowdown overhealth care bill

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On the other end of the ideological spectrum, Senator BernieSanders, the Vermont independent, said on NBC that “there’s no wayon God’s Earth that this bill should be passed this week.” Sanders,who in the past has criticized Obamacare as insufficient, saidhe’ll push ahead with legislation for a “Medicare for all,single-payer program.”

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Chuck Schumer, the Senate Democratic leader, said the Republicanbill has “at best a 50-50 chance” of passing in its current form.‘The bill is just devastating. And that’s what’s making it so hardfor them to pass it,” Schumer said on ABC.

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Trump jawboning

The views of Senate’s conservative anti-Obamacare faction wereechoed on Saturday by leaders of the influential Koch networkduring the donor retreat in Colorado.

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“We’ve been disappointed that movement has not been moredramatic toward a full repeal or a broader rollback of this law,Obamacare,” Tim Phillips, president of Americans forProsperity, funded by billionaire brothers Charles and DavidKoch, told reporters.

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The CBO is expected to release its estimate of the bill’s impactin the next few days. That’s being watched to see how it compareswith the House bill, passed in May, which the non-partisan officeestimated would cause some 23 million Americans to lose healthinsurance during the next decade.

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Trump on Saturday started to pressure the potential Republicanholdouts. “I cannot imagine that these very fine RepublicanSenators would allow the American people to suffer a brokenObamaCare any longer!” Trump said on Twitter.

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Conway said the president has been working the phones and havingpersonal meetings with lawmakers to help pass the bill. Still, inan interview with “Fox and Friends” broadcast early Sunday, Trumpadmitted for the first time that he’d called the House health bill“mean,” despite marking its passage in that chamber with a jubilantceremony in the White House Rose Garden.

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‘Sense of urgency’

Cornyn said of Trump’s activities that “he’s going to beimportant in the process” while adding, “we’re trying to hold himback a little bit. There’s a sense of urgency to move ahead becauseinsurance companies are pulling out of health-care exchanges,Cornyn said, adding that he thinks “about Aug. 1st” is the deadlinefor acting.

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Even with opposition within his own party, McConnell may havesome tricks up his sleeve. The veteran Senate tactician may havemade some intentional omissions in the “discussion draft” hereleased on June 22 so that other lawmakers can be seen to securepublic victories in return for their support.

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In that vein, Senator Bill Cassidy of Louisiana said Sunday onCBS’s “Face the Nation” that while he’s undecided on the bill, he’sopen to a “yes” vote if certain elements that affect his state canbe addressed. “I frankly would like more days to consider this,” hesaid.

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