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Opioid illustration The modest size of the reduction among those who were notified of a death suggests “that clinicians exercised greater caution with opioids rather than abandoning use,” according to the study. (Image: Shutterstock)

Physicians and other medical providers modestly reduced the volume of opioids they prescribed after being told one of their patients had died of an overdose, according to research published Thursday.

“You can hear a lot of statistics about the crisis,” said Jason Doctor, lead author of the study, published Thursday in the journal Science. “But it always feels like it is happening elsewhere if you are not aware of any deaths in your own practice.”

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