Wealthier retirees will see moresubstantial increases to Part B premiums, which are based offretirees' income. About 5 percent of Part B enrollees are affectedby income-related monthly adjustment amounts, which can be seenbelow. (Photo: Shutterstock)

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Premiums and deductibles on Medicare plans will see only nominalincreases for most beneficiaries in 2019, according to the Centersfor Medicare and Medicaid Services.

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Individual enrollees and couples in Part B plans that make lessthan $85,000 and $170,000, respectively, will see a standardmonthly premium increase of $1.50 to $135.50.

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Wealthier retirees will see more substantial increases to Part Bpremiums, which are based off retirees' income. About 5 percent ofPart B enrollees are affected by income-related monthly adjustmentamounts:

  • Individuals with income between $85,000 and $107,000, andcouples with earnings between $170,000 and $214,000 will see a$54.10 monthly premium increase, to $189.60.
  • Individuals with income between $107,000 and $133,500 andcouples with earnings between $214,000 and $267,000 will see a$135.40 monthly premium increase, to $270.90.
  • Individuals with income between $133,500 and $160,000 andcouples with earnings between $267,000 and $320,000 will see a$216.70 monthly premium increase, to $352.20.
  • Individuals with income between $160,000 and $500,000 andcouples with earnings between $320,000 and $750,000 will see a$297.90 monthly premium increase, to $433.40.
  • Individuals with income exceeding $500,000 and couples withearnings more than $750,000 will see a $325.00 monthly premiumincrease, to $460.50.

Part B plans cover physician services, outpatient services, andsome home health services.

Part B premiums and Social Security COLA

Part B premiums are deducted from Social Security payments. Thisweek, the Social Security Administration announced a 2.8 percentcost of living adjustment to account for year-over-yearinflation.

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That will result in a $39 a month increase to the averagebenefit for all retirees, which will be $1,461 in 2019.

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Under Social Security's hold-harmless provision, increases inPart B premiums for some beneficiaries cannot be greater thanSocial Security's COLA increase.

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According to CMS, 3.5 percent of Medicare beneficiaries, orabout 2 million enrollees, will pay less than the full Part Bmonthly premium on account of the hold-harmless provision.

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Part B's annual deductible will be $185 in 2019, up $2 from2018.

Slight increases to Medicare Part A deductibles

Enrollees in Medicare Part A, which covers inpatient services,will see slightly higher deductible payments in 2019.

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The inpatient hospital deductible will be $1,364 for 2019, up$24 from $1,340 in 2018.

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About 99 percent of enrollees don't pay a monthly premium onPart A plans because they paid into the program during workingyears.

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The plan covers 60 days of inpatient care.

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After that period is exhausted, beneficiaries pay dailyco-insurance fees. In 2019, that rate will be $341 a day for days61 to 90 in the hospital, and $682 a day after that. Those ratesare up marginally from 2018.

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Nick Thornton

Nick Thornton is a financial writer covering retirement and health care issues for BenefitsPRO and ALM Media. He greatly enjoys learning from the vast minds in the legal, academic, advisory and money management communities when covering the retirement space. He's also written on international marketing trends, financial institution risk management, defense and energy issues, the restaurant industry in New York City, surfing, cigars, rum, travel, and fishing. When not writing, he's pushing into some land or water.