Job search on keyboard A growingnumber of employers are helping their employees land their next jobas part of their commitment to career development. (Image:Shutterstock)

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Most employees are not shy about looking for a new job while still at theircurrent job – and it turns out that a growing number of employersare encouraging them to do so.

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Indeed, 78 percent of professionals say they would feel at leastsomewhat comfortable looking for a new job while with theirpresent company, according to a survey from Accountemps, a Robert Half company.More than six in 10 respondents (64 percent) say they'd likelyconduct search activities from work.

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Related: Are you prepared for job candidates to ask, “Whyshould I work here?”

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Professionals ages 18 to 34 are the most open to conducting jobsearch activities at work (72 percent), compared to those ages 35to 54 (63 percent) and 55 and older (46 percent). In addition, theresearch showed men are more likely to conduct job searchactivities from the workplace (72 percent) than women (55percent).

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“While it's OK to pursue new opportunities while employed, asearch should never interfere with your current job — scheduleinterviews during lunch breaks or outside of business hours,” saysMichael Steinitz, executive director of Accountemps.

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A growing number of employers, especially those in the techfield such as Netflix and GCrowd, are now helping their employeesland their next job, as part of their commitment to career development, according to Business Insider.

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Netflix posts on its website: “Knowing that other companies wouldquickly hire you if you left Netflix is comforting. We seeoccasional outside interviewing as healthy, and encourage employeesto talk with their managers about what they learn in theprocess.”

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Patty McCord, Netflix's former chief talent officer tellsBusiness Insider that this openness has anumber of potential benefits. For example, interviewing can helpemployees clarify their professional goals because they may be morehonest with the hiring manager than they are with their currentboss. On the other hand, it can make workers appreciate theircurrent company more.

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G2 Crowd's chief marketing officer Ryan Bonnici writes in theHarvard Business Review that he activelyencourages his employees to pursue outside job offers because “ithelps the business succeed.”

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“When I make clear to my employees that I want them to considerall options for their careers, they see that I'm genuinelycommitted to helping them learn and grow,” Bonnici writes. “Theyknow it's not lip service; I care about their development. If Ithink they've gotten to the top of their learning curve on my team,and I can't figure out a way to help them grow, I will supporttheir efforts to get a job somewhere else.”

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Bonnici cites research that found employees often quit notbecause of their company but because of their manager.

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“They stay for a manager they believe in — one who wants to helpthem achieve their goals,” he writes in HBR. “I've had employeestell me they chose to come work for me, and chose to stay, becauseof that commitment.”

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Katie Kuehner-Hebert

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in Running Springs, Calif. She has more than three decades of journalism experience, with particular expertise in employee benefits and other human resource topics.